Category: Estate Planning

A Psychiatric Advance Directive is an Additional tool to Consider

A Psychiatric Advance Directive is an Additional tool to Consider

Comprehensive estate planning today includes elder law and other strategies that help protect your assets and interests if you experience cognitive decline or incapacity. Have you thought about protecting your mental health and care if you can’t advocate for yourself? Based on the Trust & Will article “Guide to Psychiatric Advance Directives – What You Need to Know,” we explore psychiatric advance directives (PADs), their purpose and how to establish them. A Psychiatric advance directive is an additional tool to consider in your overall estate plan.

You might not have heard of psychiatric advance directives (PADs). However, they might be an important strategy in your estate plan. PADs are instructions and preferences for your mental health care. Similar to a living will or advance medical directives, PADs are a legal document outlining your preferences for psychiatric treatment should you become unable to make decisions due to a mental illness crisis. Picture it as your roadmap, guiding healthcare providers on your treatment choices, from medications to therapies, even during challenging times when communication might be difficult.

Psychological and physical health are essential for an individual’s overall wellness. Psychiatric advance directives proactively communicate your psychological treatment preferences,  empowering an advocate for your mental health care.

Consider it a letter of instructions to a trusted friend or family member and your healthcare team, ensuring that your wishes are respected and understood regarding your choice of psychiatric provider and mental health facility.

You probably know about advance medical directives and medical powers of attorney in estate planning. Most PADs have these two components. It’s crucial to meet state-specific requirements, such as being of legal age and having witnesses. Remember, PADs come into effect when you’re determined unable to make mental health decisions, often by a qualified mental health professional.

Key Psychiatric Advance Directives (PADs) in Estate Planning Takeaways:

  • What Are PADs? PADs are legal documents that include advance medical directives and powers of attorney outlining one’s mental health wishes.
  • Why Have PADs? Instructions and guidance for psychological care when an individual is incapacitated.
  • How to Establish PADS? Requirements are the same as advance medical directives and a medical POA.

Your mental health matters, and A psychiatric advance directive is an additional tool to consider in your overall estate planning. Speak to an Estate Planning or Elder Law attorney to discuss your needs and how a PAD may play a role. If you would like to learn more about advance directives, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Trust & Will “Guide to Psychiatric Advance Directives – What You Need to Know,”

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Alternatives to Avoid Guardianship as You Age

Alternatives to Avoid Guardianship as You Age

Individuals often overlook strategies in their estate planning to avoid restrictive guardianship if they become incapacitated. While guardianship protects individuals who cannot decide or act for themselves, it can inadvertently strip them of their autonomy. There are alternatives to avoid guardianship as you age.

The restrictive nature of a court-appointed guardian acting on behalf of an impaired individual doesn’t account for that person’s wishes. In a video titled “Alternatives to Guardianship,” The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC) highlights essential guardianship alternatives that preserve a person’s autonomy. This article discusses the need for protection as we age, what guardianship is and how powers of attorney (POAs) are alternative estate planning strategies that give individuals more control over decision-making.

Aging and estate planning go hand-in-hand. Estate plans with strategies that address cognitive decline and incapacity protect you from financial risks, including misuse of assets or unauthorized withdrawals. When it comes to healthcare, individuals must retain control over medical decisions. They may not be honored if you are incapacitated without legally documented healthcare wishes.

Guardianship involves the legal authority granted to a court-appointed guardian to act and make decisions for a person who is physically or mentally incapable. The guardian oversees the person’s health, medical care and property. When an individual is evaluated and deemed incapacitated, a court will assign a guardian.

A guardian’s responsibilities include making personal care decisions, overseeing living arrangements and handling their financial affairs. They are required to keep detailed records and check in with the court regularly.  However, guardianships are often appointed without considering alternatives, and they strip an individual of all decision-making authority, including where they live, what they eat and whether they will get any medical care. ACTEC notes that guardianship can be hurtful to the family, in addition to being an expensive process.

A power of attorney (POA) is a legal document that appoints someone you trust to act on your behalf. Only a durable power of attorney is valid if you are incapacitated. There are different POAs to protect your financial interests and medical wishes.

To prevent financial risks if you are incapacitated, a financial power of attorney names an agent with authority over financial matters, such as accessing bank accounts, paying bills and managing retirement accounts, real estate and investments.

A medical power of attorney is a healthcare or advance directive that allows someone else to make medical decisions based on your wishes. Often called a health care agent, this person follows your medical treatment as outlined in the document.

Key Guardianship Alternatives Takeaways:

  • Common Risks as We Age: Financial loss and unwanted medical care.
  • Typical Cons of Guardianship: Total loss of autonomy with court-appointed guardians.
  • Important Benefits of POAs: More control of your wishes and asset protection.

Elder law and estate planning strategies that protect you as you age should not be synonymous with surrendering autonomy through guardianship. Individuals can confidently navigate this terrain by exploring alternatives to avoid guardianship as you age. If you would like to learn more about guardianships, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC) (May 13, 2021) “Alternatives to Guardianship”

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The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 5

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 5 is out now!

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 5 is out now! Millennials continue to be a mystery to everyone – except Millennials! In this fourth part of Millennial Mysteries, Brad and his Millennial son, Sam, discuss and review a movie they recently saw: Civil War.

Be aware that Boomer Brad thinks this is one of the WORST movies he has ever seen – and Sam, of course, one of the BEST – they’ll explain why!

They have a very entertaining discussion on how movies affect Millennials and what Millennials want to see in movies. And this movie has been highlighted and promoted as a cautionary tale of what could happen in our country in the future!

 

In each episode of The Estate of The Union podcast, host and lawyer Brad Wiewel will give valuable insights into the confusing world of estate planning, making an often daunting subject easier to understand. It is Estate Planning Made Simple! The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 5 is out now! The episode can be found on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you get your podcasts. If you would prefer to watch the video version, please visit our YouTube page. Please click on the links to listen to or watch the new installment of The Estate of The Union podcast. We hope you enjoy it.

The Estate of The Union Season |Episode 5

 

Texas Trust Law focuses its practice exclusively in the area of wills, probate, estate planning, asset protection, and special needs planning. Brad Wiewel is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We provide estate planning services, asset protection planning, business planning, and retirement exit strategies.

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Topics You need to Address before a Mid-Life Marriage

Topics You need to Address before a Mid-Life Marriage

Today’s wedding couple is as likely to be 30 or 50 years old as they are to be in their twenties. This trend underscores the importance of having open discussions about finances and retirement before exchanging vows. A recent article from Next Avenue, “The Talk Over-50s Should Have Before Tying the Knot.” Whether you’re getting married for the first time or the second, being closer to retirement has major financial implications. There are topics you need to address before a mid-life marriage.

The most important thing is to disclose each person’s financial situation completely. For some people, this includes their retirement goals and lifestyle choices. What are the potential healthcare issues? Is there debt to be considered? How are each managing their investments?

If both people own homes, a plan for going forward needs to ask a simple question: where will the couple live? Will one sell their home or turn it into a rental property? If it is sold, will the seller retain all the income, or will they buy into ownership of the joint residence? Emotional attachments to homes can make this a difficult discussion, but it needs to be addressed.

Getting married changes each spouse’s legal status, meaning estate plans must be updated. If both have an existing estate plan, it needs to be reviewed. Powers of Attorney, Healthcare Proxy, and other estate planning documents must also be updated.

While reviewing and revising estate plans, don’t neglect to check on any accounts with named beneficiaries. More than a few ex-spouses have received insurance proceeds or accounts because someone neglected to update these accounts. The named beneficiary overrides anything in your will, which is critical to updating the estate plan.

If you both have children from prior marriages, meeting with an estate planning attorney to determine how to manage property distribution is another critical step before getting married. You may wish to create and fund trusts before marriage, so assets remain separate property. There are as many different types of trusts as there are family situations, from keeping assets separate to providing for a surviving spouse while ensuring biological children receive their inheritance (SLAT), or family trusts where assets are moved into the trust for the surviving spouse to allocate assets to heirs based on their needs.

Social Security planning should also be part of the discussion. If one spouse is a widow who was receiving survivor benefits, they could lose those benefits when they get married.

Talk with an estate planning attorney to address these topics before a mid-life marriage. That way you fully understand your situation and ensure you and your spouse are ready for the changes and challenges of your senior years together. If you would like to learn more about mid-life or second marriages and estate planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Next Avenue (March 14, 2024) “The Talk Over-50s Should Have Before Tying the Knot”

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Estate Planning for Veterans and Active Military Is Important

Estate Planning for Veterans and Active Military Is Important

Your dedication to your country is unwavering as a veteran or active military service member. While you’re committed to your duty, you must protect yourself and your loved ones and preserve your legacy. Veterans and active military personnel can and should create an estate plan to match their unique needs. Based on Trust & Will’s article, “Estate Planning for Veterans & Active Military,” we look at why estate planning for veterans and active military personnel is so important.

Military life is marked by unpredictability and uncertainty for you and your family, making estate planning a vital aspect of preparing for the future. Many individuals have plans to distribute funds and appoint trusted loved ones to handle medical and financial matters if the unthinkable happens. Estate planning is essential to help provide for your loved ones if you pass away or are incapacitated. Knowing that your family will be cared for can give you peace of mind.

A will serves as a cornerstone of your estate plan, allowing you to:

  • Protect Your Family: Specify guardianship for minor children, ensuring they’re cared for by trusted individuals in your absence.
  • Distribute Assets Seamlessly: Designate beneficiaries and outline asset distribution instructions, including real estate, retirement and financial accounts, sentimental items, and other property.
  • Plan for the Unexpected: Outline your preferences for medical care and end-of-life decisions to prepare for unforeseen circumstances.

In the military, adaptability is critical, but so is ensuring your affairs are managed in your absence. Powers of Attorney enable you to:

  • Delegate Your Decisions: If you are incapacitated, designate trusted individuals to handle your legal, financial, and medical decisions.
  • Manage Your Affairs: Maintain continuity in managing assets, paying bills, and making critical decisions, even during deployments or periods of incapacity.
  • Mitigate Financial Risk: Protect against financial exploitation and past-due bills by appointing reliable agents to act in your best interests.

For military families, asset protection and efficient wealth transfer are paramount. Trusts offer a range of benefits, including:

  • Asset Preservation: Safeguard assets during incapacity or deployment, ensuring financial stability for your family.
  • Probate Avoidance: Streamline the distribution of assets to beneficiaries, bypassing the lengthy and costly probate process.
  • Tax Efficiency: Minimize estate taxes and maximize tax savings, preserving more of your hard-earned assets for future generations.

Your dedication and sacrifice are unmatched as a veteran or active military service member. That is why estate planning is so important for veterans and active military personnel. By prioritizing estate planning and including will, trust, and power of attorney strategies, you can protect your loved ones and preserve your legacy for generations. Consult with an experienced estate planning attorney for peace of mind. If you would like to learn more about planning for veterans, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Trust & Will “Estate Planning for Veterans & Active Military,”

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Senior Property Tax Exemption can provide Relief

Senior Property Tax Exemption can provide Relief

Estate planning and elder law attorneys often help retirees face unique challenges, such as how to afford their property’s rising values and real estate taxes on a fixed income. However, there’s good news: several states offer a senior property tax exemption, which can provide much-needed relief. Based on The Mortgage Reports’ article, “Property Tax Exemption for Seniors: What Is It and How to Claim It,” we look closely at the exemption and if it might work for you.

Only proactive seniors who ask their state, county, or city agency about tax breaks know if their state has a property tax exemption and if they qualify. The states with tax exemptions for homeowners ages 65 and older, like New York or Washington, likely won’t tell you if you qualify. If your state offers this tax break, claiming it is simpler than you might think.

What exactly are senior property tax exemptions? These exemptions are a lifeline for individuals aged 65 or older, reducing the burden of property taxes on their wallets. While property taxes are notoriously unpopular, especially among retirees on fixed incomes, these exemptions offer hope. The exemption helps seniors on fixed incomes by reducing the property value on which homeowners at least 65 years of age pay taxes. The tax rate remains the same for everyone: the reduced taxable value of property or properties. In some states, your tax exemption increases as you age.

States that offer a property exemption can reduce taxes based on a percentage or dollar amount. The amount seniors save varies by location, what they qualify for and their property value.

Senior property tax exemptions vary by state. In most states, you must meet minimum age requirements and prove that you occupy the home as your primary residence. The minimum age threshold varies from state to state, ranging from 61 to 65.  Income limit requirements also often exist. A higher income might disqualify you or reduce your exemption.

To claim your exemption, you must apply with your local tax office. Deadlines vary, so make sure to check your state’s requirements. Most states have websites where you can find the necessary forms and instructions.

Each state has its own set of rules and benefits regarding senior property tax exemptions. Some counties offer additional tax savings. By working with a local estate planning or elder law attorney, you can incorporate additional tax-saving strategies into your estate plan. Understanding your local rules and taking advantage of any available exemptions is essential.

The senior property tax exemption can provide much-needed tax relief for fixed-income budgets. By understanding the eligibility criteria, filing on time, and exploring state-specific benefits, you can lighten the burden of property taxes and enjoy a more financially secure retirement. If you would like to learn more about property taxes and estate planning, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: The Mortgage Reports (Jan 29, 2024) “Property Tax Exemption for Seniors: What It Is and How to Claim It.

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The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 5

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 4 is out now!

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 4 is out now! It surprises some people to discover that the mortality rate in Texas and the USA and the world for that matter is 100%! None of us are getting out of here alive. How we leave this planet can sometimes be determined by how we want to.

While many people die suddenly, many others linger. And the prolonged dying process is where Hospice Austin come into play. We are privileged to have Keisha Jones, the Director of In-Patient Services at Hospice Austin share with us a “better way to die.”

While there are many for profit hospices, and an article in a recent edition of Scientific American highlighted that Hedge Funds are buying up hospices nationwide, Hospice Austin is the only non-profit one in this area. Keisha shares her unique insights into the dying process and gives hope, and we are very thankful for her allowing us to interview her.

To learn more about the incredibly valuable work that Hospice Austin does for the community, please visit their website: www.hospiceaustin.org

 

In each episode of The Estate of The Union podcast, host and lawyer Brad Wiewel will give valuable insights into the confusing world of estate planning, making an often daunting subject easier to understand. It is Estate Planning Made Simple! The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 4 is out now! The episode can be found on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you get your podcasts. If you would prefer to watch the video version, please visit our YouTube page. Please click on the links to listen to or watch the new installment of The Estate of The Union podcast. We hope you enjoy it.

The Estate of The Union Season |Episode 4

 

Texas Trust Law focuses its practice exclusively in the area of wills, probate, estate planning, asset protection, and special needs planning. Brad Wiewel is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We provide estate planning services, asset protection planning, business planning, and retirement exit strategies.

www.texastrustlaw.com/read-our-books

Avoiding Trouble with Your Trustee

Avoiding Trouble with Your Trustee

Estate planning and elder law considerations linger in the background of our senior years. We plan for senior living, incapacity, and Medicaid. We create an estate plan to protect and preserve your wealth and provide for heirs after you are gone. Trusts are a smart and well-known estate planning tool that names or appoints a trustee to administer and distribute the assets according to the terms. However, how often do estate owners ask, “What if something goes wrong and the trustee breaches their duties?” This blog offers tips on avoiding trouble with your trustee.

The case discussed in WealthCounsel’s article, Trustee of Living Trust Who Was Beneficiary of Decedent’s Residuary Estate Had Duty to Collect and Protect Assets Not Yet Transferred to Trust,” reminds us to take steps in appointing the right trustee and to draft the trust’s terms carefully.

The case discussed in WealthCounsel’s article involved three beneficiaries, three co-trustees and assets meant for a restated revocable trust. One of the trustees did not collect and protect untransferred trust assets. The deceased’s three children and their mother sued that trustee for breaching fiduciary duty.

The Barash v. Lembo case underscores a critical aspect of trusteeship: the duty to protect and collect assets awaiting transfer into the trust designated for distribution from the trust. Despite the probate process, trustees must proactively preserve trust assets, even before their transfer.

In this case, the Connecticut Supreme Court emphasized that trustees are entrusted with a fiduciary duty from the moment of acceptance. This duty extends to diligently administering the trust in the beneficiaries’ best interests, including the prudent collection and protection of assets.

Central to the trustee’s role is the obligation to uncover and address breaches of fiduciary duty by prior fiduciaries. Whether it’s compelling the transfer of assets or rectifying breaches, trustees must act in the trust’s best interests.

When a testamentary trust emerges as a will beneficiary, trustees are tasked with pursuing reasonable claims against the estate executor. This duty demands due diligence in securing all trust assets and ensuring comprehensive asset management.

While a duty of due diligence binds trustees, evaluating their performance hinges on contextual considerations. All trustee’s actions are scrutinized within the framework of trust administration dynamics, emphasizing the need for meticulous asset management.

In Barash v. Lembo, the court’s ruling underscores the significance of trustees’ proactive engagement in protecting and collecting trust assets. Trustees must exercise diligence and vigilance, leveraging legal avenues to preserve beneficiaries’ interests.

In your pursuit of avoiding trouble with your trustee, partner with a seasoned estate planning attorney who understands the intricacies of trust administration. If you would like to learn more about trustees and trust administration, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: WealthCounsel (Jan 19, 2024) “Trustee of Living Trust Who Was Beneficiary of Decedent’s Residuary Estate Had Duty to Collect and Protect Assets Not Yet Transferred to Trust.”

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Explore the Intricacies of Business Trusts

Explore the Intricacies of Business Trusts

Entrepreneurs often seek robust mechanisms to safeguard assets and navigate liability in the intricate landscape of business ownership. Enter the realm of business trusts—a lesser-known yet powerful tool entrepreneurs can leverage to secure their ventures. Based on SmartAsset’s article, What Is a Business Trust and How Does It Work, we’ll explore the intricacies of business trusts, uncovering their nuances and exploring their potential advantages and drawbacks.

At the heart of business trusts lies a fundamental premise: the delegation of authority to manage a beneficiary stake in a business. Functionally akin to individual or family trusts, business trusts serve as legal instruments facilitating asset management on behalf of the grantor.

A business trust holds the rights to an individual’s stake in a business entity. In a sense, the trust, as a legal entity, owns the business. With the potential to shield against taxes and liability, business trusts offer a compelling avenue for entrepreneurs seeking robust asset protection.

Creating a business trust typically starts with deliberations between involved parties and a trust lawyer. This legal instrument, a declaration of trust, formalizes the terms governing the trust’s operation.

Central to the trust’s dynamics is the fiduciary duty entrusted to the trustee—the individual responsible for managing the trust’s assets in the best interests of beneficiaries. This fiduciary obligation underscores the trustee’s paramount responsibility to act prudently and diligently.

Just as individual trusts come in various forms, business trusts exhibit diversity in structure and function. Here’s a breakdown of the primary categories:

  • Grantor Trust Characterized by the grantor’s control over trust assets and taxation, this trust type offers a self-contained framework for asset management.
  • Simple Trust Operating under IRS verification, this trust directly distributes profits to beneficiaries without accessing principal assets.
  • Complex Trust Offering greater flexibility, this trust type permits partial distribution of profits and contributions to external entities, such as charities.

While business trusts present enticing benefits—from liability protection to enhanced privacy—they pose certain challenges. Here’s a snapshot of the pros and cons:

Pros:

  • Liability Protection: Shields beneficiaries from individual liability, akin to LLCs or corporations.
  • Privacy Enhancement: Offers an additional layer of privacy in asset management.
  • Flexible Distribution Terms: Facilitates tailored distribution schedules for beneficiaries.

Cons:

  • Cost and Complexity: Establishing and maintaining a business trust can be expensive and legally intricate.
  • Legal Compliance Challenges: Navigating legal requirements and compliance hurdles can pose significant obstacles.
  • Lifetime Limitations: Business trusts are typically constrained by a maximum lifespan of 99 years, limiting multi-generational arrangements.

If you’re considering a business trust, the journey begins with competent legal guidance. Collaborate with a trust lawyer to navigate the intricacies of trust creation and ensure alignment with your business goals and objectives.

While establishing a business trust entails upfront costs and legal complexities, the potential benefits of asset protection and operational flexibility can be substantial. Before proceeding, it’s crucial to weigh the key considerations and assess the suitability of a business trust for your unique circumstances.

Business Trusts Key Takeaways:

  • Early Consultation is Key: Engage with a trust lawyer early in the process to navigate legal complexities and ensure alignment with your business objectives.
  • Deliberate Consideration is Essential: Thoroughly assess the pros and cons of a business trust, weighing factors such as cost, complexity, and compliance.
  • Tailored Solutions Yield Optimal Results: Customize your business trust to align with your unique needs, leveraging its flexibility to achieve optimal asset protection and operational efficiency.

If you are ready to explore the intricacies of business trusts, schedule a consultation with a seasoned estate planning attorney today. If you would like to learn more about business trusts, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: SmartAsset (April 19, 2023) “What Is a Business Trust and How Does It Work”

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New IRS Tax Rule affects Irrevocable Trusts in Estate Planning

New IRS Tax Rule affects Irrevocable Trusts in Estate Planning

Trusts have been foundational estate planning strategies for decades and are becoming more popular as economic shifts and the aging population highlight unique estate planning goals. An irrevocable trust is one practical estate planning strategy for excluding assets from an estate’s taxable value, safeguarding wealth and helping to meet asset threshold limits for government benefits like Medicaid. The Tax Advisor details how the 2023-2 IRS tax rule has significantly impacted estate planning strategies, particularly irrevocable trusts. We look at how this new IRS tax rule affects irrevocable trusts in your estate planning.

Capital gains taxes are the heart of the IRS Rule 2023-2 changes. Individuals pay taxes on the difference between an asset’s purchase price and a higher sell price as that asset’s value grows over time. The original purchase price is their cost basis or non-taxed value. Amounts over the cost basis are taxed as a capital gain. Assets include property, investments, cars and anything providing income or profit. If you create or update an estate plan, the IRS rule may change your estate planning or updates in 2024. Work with an experienced estate planning attorney to find the right type of trust for your goals and structure it accordingly.

The cost basis for an asset’s beneficiaries significantly impacts capital gains taxes once they sell. Capital gains from the deceased’s date of purchase will be much higher than fair market value on the date of death. An irrevocable trust typically gave heirs a break by calculating an inherited asset’s capital gains from the fair market value at the owner’s death. That tax break has changed.

The IRS issued Rule 2023-2 in early 2023, which impacts an inherited asset’s cost basis for capital gains taxes. The cost basis was calculated on the fair market value on the date of death but is based on the deceased’s date of purchase as of March 2023. Calculating taxes from the date of purchase is considered a “step-down,” meaning a lower cost base and higher capital gains. Conversely, the date of death means fair market value at a higher cost basis and less capital gains.

The main differentiator with an irrevocable trust is its ability to exclude assets from an estate’s valuation. The person establishing an irrevocable trust technically no longer owns the assets. This type of trust is a strategy that helps older adults applying for Medicaid benefits meet maximum thresholds.

With the new IRS rule, assets in an irrevocable trust are not part of the owner’s taxable estate at their death and are not eligible for the fair market valuation when transferred to an heir. The 2023-2 rule doesn’t give an heir the higher cost basis or fair market value of the inherited asset. Once they sell that asset, capital gains taxes are calculated using the value when the deceased purchased it.

Families increasingly use irrevocable trusts to safeguard assets from spend-down for government benefits, like Medicaid and VA Aid and Attendance.

Future considerations must include reevaluating how irrevocable trusts are structured to navigate the evolving tax landscape effectively. Planning strategies need to adapt to ensure that assets are protected, and taxes are minimized for the benefit of future generations.

This new IRS tax rule raises important considerations about how it might affect irrevocable trust estate planning. While it may seem like irrevocable trust planning could lead to additional taxes for beneficiaries, the reality is more nuanced. Future considerations in estate planning involve setting up irrevocable trusts that align with new IRS rules. If you would like to learn more about irrevocable trusts, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: The Tax Advisor (Nov. 1, 2023) “Rev. Rul. 2023-2’s Impact on Estate Plans.”

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Information in our blogs is very general in nature and should not be acted upon without first consulting with an attorney. Please feel free to contact Texas Trust Law to schedule a complimentary consultation.
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