Category: Spouse

Topics You need to Address before a Mid-Life Marriage

Topics You need to Address before a Mid-Life Marriage

Today’s wedding couple is as likely to be 30 or 50 years old as they are to be in their twenties. This trend underscores the importance of having open discussions about finances and retirement before exchanging vows. A recent article from Next Avenue, “The Talk Over-50s Should Have Before Tying the Knot.” Whether you’re getting married for the first time or the second, being closer to retirement has major financial implications. There are topics you need to address before a mid-life marriage.

The most important thing is to disclose each person’s financial situation completely. For some people, this includes their retirement goals and lifestyle choices. What are the potential healthcare issues? Is there debt to be considered? How are each managing their investments?

If both people own homes, a plan for going forward needs to ask a simple question: where will the couple live? Will one sell their home or turn it into a rental property? If it is sold, will the seller retain all the income, or will they buy into ownership of the joint residence? Emotional attachments to homes can make this a difficult discussion, but it needs to be addressed.

Getting married changes each spouse’s legal status, meaning estate plans must be updated. If both have an existing estate plan, it needs to be reviewed. Powers of Attorney, Healthcare Proxy, and other estate planning documents must also be updated.

While reviewing and revising estate plans, don’t neglect to check on any accounts with named beneficiaries. More than a few ex-spouses have received insurance proceeds or accounts because someone neglected to update these accounts. The named beneficiary overrides anything in your will, which is critical to updating the estate plan.

If you both have children from prior marriages, meeting with an estate planning attorney to determine how to manage property distribution is another critical step before getting married. You may wish to create and fund trusts before marriage, so assets remain separate property. There are as many different types of trusts as there are family situations, from keeping assets separate to providing for a surviving spouse while ensuring biological children receive their inheritance (SLAT), or family trusts where assets are moved into the trust for the surviving spouse to allocate assets to heirs based on their needs.

Social Security planning should also be part of the discussion. If one spouse is a widow who was receiving survivor benefits, they could lose those benefits when they get married.

Talk with an estate planning attorney to address these topics before a mid-life marriage. That way you fully understand your situation and ensure you and your spouse are ready for the changes and challenges of your senior years together. If you would like to learn more about mid-life or second marriages and estate planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Next Avenue (March 14, 2024) “The Talk Over-50s Should Have Before Tying the Knot”

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Estate Planning for Veterans and Active Military Is Important

Estate Planning for Veterans and Active Military Is Important

Your dedication to your country is unwavering as a veteran or active military service member. While you’re committed to your duty, you must protect yourself and your loved ones and preserve your legacy. Veterans and active military personnel can and should create an estate plan to match their unique needs. Based on Trust & Will’s article, “Estate Planning for Veterans & Active Military,” we look at why estate planning for veterans and active military personnel is so important.

Military life is marked by unpredictability and uncertainty for you and your family, making estate planning a vital aspect of preparing for the future. Many individuals have plans to distribute funds and appoint trusted loved ones to handle medical and financial matters if the unthinkable happens. Estate planning is essential to help provide for your loved ones if you pass away or are incapacitated. Knowing that your family will be cared for can give you peace of mind.

A will serves as a cornerstone of your estate plan, allowing you to:

  • Protect Your Family: Specify guardianship for minor children, ensuring they’re cared for by trusted individuals in your absence.
  • Distribute Assets Seamlessly: Designate beneficiaries and outline asset distribution instructions, including real estate, retirement and financial accounts, sentimental items, and other property.
  • Plan for the Unexpected: Outline your preferences for medical care and end-of-life decisions to prepare for unforeseen circumstances.

In the military, adaptability is critical, but so is ensuring your affairs are managed in your absence. Powers of Attorney enable you to:

  • Delegate Your Decisions: If you are incapacitated, designate trusted individuals to handle your legal, financial, and medical decisions.
  • Manage Your Affairs: Maintain continuity in managing assets, paying bills, and making critical decisions, even during deployments or periods of incapacity.
  • Mitigate Financial Risk: Protect against financial exploitation and past-due bills by appointing reliable agents to act in your best interests.

For military families, asset protection and efficient wealth transfer are paramount. Trusts offer a range of benefits, including:

  • Asset Preservation: Safeguard assets during incapacity or deployment, ensuring financial stability for your family.
  • Probate Avoidance: Streamline the distribution of assets to beneficiaries, bypassing the lengthy and costly probate process.
  • Tax Efficiency: Minimize estate taxes and maximize tax savings, preserving more of your hard-earned assets for future generations.

Your dedication and sacrifice are unmatched as a veteran or active military service member. That is why estate planning is so important for veterans and active military personnel. By prioritizing estate planning and including will, trust, and power of attorney strategies, you can protect your loved ones and preserve your legacy for generations. Consult with an experienced estate planning attorney for peace of mind. If you would like to learn more about planning for veterans, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Trust & Will “Estate Planning for Veterans & Active Military,”

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Understanding Marital Trusts in Your Estate Plan

Understanding Marital Trusts in Your Estate Plan

Married couples looking to secure their financial future and provide for the surviving spouse tax-efficiently may consider a marital trust.  This article will provide an understanding of marital trusts, how they work and their role in an your estate plan.

A marital trust is a legal arrangement in estate planning used predominantly by married couples. It is designed to provide financial benefits to a surviving spouse and can be a crucial part of an estate plan. Marital trusts ensure that upon the death of one spouse, the surviving spouse receives assets held in the trust. This arrangement not only offers financial security but also involves estate tax considerations.

In an estate plan, a marital trust comes into play upon the death of the first spouse. It’s created to transfer assets to the surviving spouse in a manner that is often exempt from immediate estate taxes, thanks to the unlimited marital deduction. This mechanism allows the surviving spouse to utilize the trust assets and potentially the income generated by these assets.

The unlimited marital deduction is a key component in how marital trusts operate. It allows for the transfer of an unrestricted amount of assets to the surviving spouse without incurring federal estate tax at the time of the first spouse’s death. This exemption is a significant advantage of using a marital trust in estate planning.

There are several types of marital trusts, each with specific features and benefits. A commonly used type is the Qualified Terminable Interest Property (QTIP) trust, which allows the first spouse to control how the trust’s assets are distributed after the death of the surviving spouse. Another type is the B Trust or credit shelter trust, which can help maximize estate tax exemption limits.

A marital trust offers numerous benefits to a surviving spouse. It ensures that the spouse can access trust assets and income, providing financial security. The trust can also stipulate how assets are managed and distributed, offering a layer of control and protection over the family’s financial legacy.

Estate tax plays a crucial role in the functioning of marital trusts. By utilizing a marital trust, you can defer the federal estate tax until the death of the surviving spouse. This deferral can result in significant tax savings, especially if the estate exceeds the federal estate tax exemption threshold.

While marital trusts offer many benefits, there are downsides to consider. One such drawback is their irrevocable nature; once established, the terms are generally set and cannot be easily altered. The surviving spouse’s estate may also be subject to increased estate taxes upon their death, depending on the trust’s structure and the value of the assets.

Establishing a marital trust involves careful planning and legal expertise. Consulting with an estate planning attorney will provide an understanding of martial trusts and ensure that the trust aligns with your estate plan. Staying informed and periodically reviewing your estate plan with an attorney is advisable to ensure that it continues to meet your objectives and complies with current laws.

There are different types of spousal trusts, each designed for specific situations and objectives. Apart from marital trusts, other options include Spousal Lifetime Access Trusts (SLATs) and bypass trusts, each offering unique advantages and serving different estate planning goals.

In conclusion, understanding marital trusts are a versatile and powerful tool will go a long way in your estate plan. They offer financial security for the surviving spouse and tax advantages and can be tailored to suit individual estate planning needs. If you would like to learn more about marital trusts, please visit our previous posts. 

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Divorce Impacts your Estate Plan

Divorce Impacts your Estate Plan

Divorce is a life-altering event that significantly impacts various aspects of life, including your estate plan. Clients either going through a divorce or have recently finalized one often feel uncertain about how the divorce will affect their estate. This article shares crucial aspects of revising your estate plan after a divorce, ensuring that your assets and loved ones are protected according to your current wishes.

When you get divorced, updating your estate plan is imperative, as your ex-spouse may still be entitled to certain benefits. Your estate, which includes all assets owned, might still be accessible to your ex-spouse unless changes are made. Revising your estate plan ensures that your assets are distributed according to your updated preferences. Updating your will is essential after a divorce. Your ex-spouse may still be named as the executor or beneficiary. By revising your will, you can ensure that your estate is administered by someone you trust and that your assets are distributed according to your latest intentions.

Revoking your power of attorney is a critical step post-divorce. Your ex-spouse may be able to make financial and care decisions on your behalf. It’s advisable to appoint someone you trust to handle these matters, ensuring that your affairs are managed according to your current preferences.

Beneficiary designations are often overlooked during estate planning after divorce. It’s crucial to revise these as your ex-spouse might still be listed as a beneficiary on life insurance policies, retirement accounts and other financial instruments. Updating these designations is a simple yet essential step in ensuring that your estate is distributed according to your current wishes. Your ex-spouse is likely named as a trustee or beneficiary if you have a living trust. Post-divorce, you need to revise this document to reflect your current wishes. This might include appointing a new trustee or changing the beneficiaries.

If you have minor children, your estate plan probably includes guardianship designations. Post-divorce, reassess these choices. You might want to name someone other than your ex-spouse as the guardian, ensuring that your children’s care aligns with your current wishes.

State law and the terms of your divorce decree can impact your estate plan. Understanding these implications and ensuring that your estate plan complies with legal requirements is important. An experienced estate planning attorney can provide valuable insights and guidance.

Don’t wait until the divorce is finalized. Start updating your estate plan as soon as the divorce is pending. This proactive approach ensures that your interests are protected throughout the divorce process.

Divorce significantly affects your estate plan, and it’s crucial to take timely action to revise it. Remember, updating your estate plan post-divorce is not just a legal necessity; ensuring that your assets and loved ones are protected according to your current wishes is crucial. Don’t hesitate to seek professional assistance to navigate this complex process. If you would like to read more about estate planning post divorce, please visit our previous posts. 

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Credit Card Debt must be Paid after Death

When you consider the average credit card balance in 2023 was $6,365, chances are many Americans will leave an unpaid credit card balance if they die suddenly. Credit card debt must be paid after death. A recent article from yahoo! finance asks and answers the question, “What happens to credit card debt when you die?”

Many people think death leads to debt forgiveness. However, this isn’t the case. Some forms of debt, like federal student loans, may be discharged if the borrower dies. However, this is the exception and not the rule.

Credit card debt doesn’t evaporate when the cardholder goes away. It generally must be paid by the estate, which means the amount of debt will reduce your loved one’s inheritance. In some cases, credit card debt might mean they don’t receive an inheritance at all.

Outstanding credit card debt is paid by your estate, which means your individual assets owned at the time of death, including real estate, bank accounts, or any other valuables acquired during your life.

Upon death, your will is submitted to the court for probate, the legal process of reviewing the transfer of assets. It ensures that all debts and taxes are paid before issuing the remaining assets to your designated heirs.

If you have a will, you likely have an executor—the person you named responsible for carrying out your wishes. They are responsible for settling any outstanding debts of the estate. If there’s no will, the court will appoint an administrator or a personal representative to manage the assets.

In most cases, your heirs won’t have to pay off your credit card debt with their own funds. However, you may be surprised to learn there are exceptions:

  • Married people living in community property states. In a community property state, the deceased spouse is responsible for repaying credit card debt incurred by their spouse. In 2023, those states include Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin.
  • Credit cards with joint owners. If you had a joint credit card shared with a partner or relative, the surviving joint owner is responsible for the full outstanding balance. Only joint users are responsible for repaying credit card debt. If your partner was an authorized user and not an owner, they aren’t legally responsible for the debt.

Debt collectors may try to collect from family members, even though the family members are not responsible for paying credit card debts. The debt collector may not state or imply that the family member is personally responsible for the debt, unless they are the spouse in a community property state or a joint account owner.

If a debt collector claims you personally owe money, request a debt validation letter showing your legal responsibility for the debt. Otherwise, you have no legal obligation to pay for it yourself.

When someone dies, their estate is responsible for paying debts, including credit card debt. However, debt is repaid in a certain order. In general, unsecured debt like credit card balances are the lowest priority and paid last.

Some accounts are exempt from debt payment:

  • Money in a 401(k) or IRA with a designated beneficiary goes directly to the beneficiary and is exempt from any debt repayment.
  • Life insurance death benefits go directly to the named beneficiary and go directly to the beneficiaries.

If a loved one has died and they had credit cards, stop using any of their cards, even if you are an authorized user or joint owner. Review the deceased’s credit report to learn what accounts are open in their name and the balance on each account. Notify credit card issuers and alert credit bureaus—Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. You may need to submit a written notification, a copy of the death certificate and proof of your being an authorized person to act on behalf of the estate.

The bottom line is this: credit card debt must be paid at your death. Talk with an estate planning attorney to find out how your state’s laws treat the outstanding debt of a deceased person, as these laws vary by state. If you would like to learn more about managing debt as an executor of an estate, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: yahoo! finance (Nov. 9, 2023) “What happens to credit card debt when you die?”

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Selling the Family Home when a Loved One needs Nursing Care

Selling the Family Home when a Loved One needs Nursing Care

When an aging relative decides the time is right to move into an assisted living or continuing care facility, families face many decisions. This is often a difficult but necessary step for older individuals with trouble living independently or planning for their future needs. Selling the family home when a loved one needs nursing care can be a challenge. A recent article from Herald—Standard, “How to handle selling a home when moving into an assisted living facility,” offers suggestions to help families navigate the process.

First, speak with an estate planning attorney to have a trusted, responsible family member be named Power of Attorney. Individuals moving into assisted living may not have any cognitive problems at the time of the move. However, selling a home for a family member who develops dementia can present complex challenges. Only a person with legal capacity may transfer their home to a new owner. Having a Power of Attorney allows a family member to step in and manage the transaction without needing to go to court and have a guardian named.

Talk about the situation and the sale with the aging family member. They will need time to process the idea of selling their home and moving. Homeowners make untold sacrifices and compromises to buy and maintain their homes, so the decision to sell a beloved home is almost always very difficult and brings out a range of emotions.

Throughout this process, an open and honest dialogue about what can be achieved by selling the home and improving their quality of life will be helpful.

Sorting through belongings is an extremely hard task. A lifetime of memories and a loss of their independence are all wrapped up in the contents of a home. It will be impossible to take the entire contents into a one or two-bedroom apartment. Take the time to sort through belongings with your family members and select certain items to give them a sense of home in a smaller space.

If possible, try to pass on some items to younger family members. Most importantly, handle this process with as much compassion as possible.

Keep all relevant people involved and current throughout the process. This is particularly important if the family members are scattered in different states. Adult children who live far away and can’t be active participants in this process shouldn’t be dismissed and left out. Open communication with other family members will minimize the chances of objections when the sale and move take place.

Finally, because this is perhaps the largest and last financial transaction, make sure the sale of their home is done with an eye to their estate plan. Selling the family home when a loved one needs nursing care may cause tax issues. There may be ways to minimize tax exposure for the individual and their estate plan. Confer with an estate planning attorney to avoid any missteps. If you would like to learn more about managing property in your estate plan, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: Herald-Standard (Oct. 27, 2023) “How to handle selling a home when moving into an assisted living facility”

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The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 5

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 10 is out now!

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 10 is out now!

Criminals and criminal law are the focus of this edition of The Estate of of the Union. Brad Wiewel talks with the best criminal lawyer in Austin, Sam Bassett. They discuss a variety of topics related to criminal law.

Sam’s knowledge and experience make this a great conversation. Sam answers two critical questions: “What to do if you war stopped by the police?”  And “How can you defend someone who you think may be guilty?” This fast-paced episode is crammed with good stories too. You’ll enjoy it.

You can request a consultation with Sam Bassett by reaching him at Minton, Bassett, Flores & Carsey, 512-476-4873 or at their website:

 

 

In each episode of The Estate of The Union podcast, host and lawyer Brad Wiewel will give valuable insights into the confusing world of estate planning, making an often daunting subject easier to understand. It is Estate Planning Made Simple! The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 10 is out now! The episode can be found on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you get your podcasts. If you would prefer to watch the video version, please visit our YouTube page. Please click on the links below to listen to or watch the new installment of The Estate of The Union podcast. We hope you enjoy it.

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 4 – How To Give Yourself a Charitable Gift is out now!

 

Texas Trust Law focuses its practice exclusively in the area of wills, probate, estate planning, asset protection, and special needs planning. Brad Wiewel is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We provide estate planning services, asset protection planning, business planning, and retirement exit strategies.

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Irrevocable Funeral Trust helps Families with expenses

Irrevocable Funeral Trust helps Families with expenses

Yahoo Finance’s recent article, “Pros and Cons of an Irrevocable Funeral Trust,” explains that an irrevocable funeral trust is a legal entity that helps families with end-of-life costs, such as funeral and burial expenses.

With this trust, you’re establishing a formal trust fund, a separate legal entity that owns the money you contributed to it. The purpose is to hold your money until you die. It then releases the funds to pay for your funeral, burial and other end-of-life expenses.

As with all trust funds, the trust has a trustee who manages its money. Here, the trustee is determined by an insurance company or funeral services company through which you set up the trust. It will usually hold as its single asset a life insurance policy that you’ve purchased.

The trust fund owns this life insurance policy and is named as the sole beneficiary. When you die, the fund collects the policy’s payment and uses this money to pay for your end-of-life costs.

A funeral trust may also name a specific funeral home as the trust’s beneficiary. For example, a given funeral home may agree to a fixed price for a funeral and burial.

When you die, the trust pays out its funds to the funeral home to cover the costs of your funeral, burial and any associated services.

As with most trusts, you can establish both revocable and irrevocable funeral trusts.

With a revocable funeral trust, you maintain ownership and control of the money and can withdraw it anytime.

However, with an irrevocable funeral trust, you no longer own the money, so you can’t withdraw it.

While an irrevocable funeral trust helps families pay for potentially expensive end-of-life expenses, it locks up your money for good and can’t be amended. If you would like to learn more about funeral planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Yahoo Finance (April 29, 2023) “Pros and Cons of an Irrevocable Funeral Trust”

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Estate Tax Exemptions available for Married Couples

Estate Tax Exemptions available for Married Couples

Estate tax avoidance and mitigation are central considerations for financial security for surviving spouses. Estate tax exemptions are available for married couples to help ensure a surviving spouse is cared for. According to a recent article from The National Law Review, “Basic Estate Tax Planning for Married Couples: Opportunities For Use Of Estate Tax Exemptions,” the first spouse may leave property of unlimited value to the surviving spouse without incurring any estate tax upon the death of the first spouse. This unlimited marital deduction shields assets from estate taxes and helps support the surviving spouse. Assets can be distributed directly to the surviving spouse or through an indirect transfer to a qualifying trust for the surviving spouse’s benefit.

Most couples use trusts for asset protection, most commonly for the preservation of assets for children from a prior marriage and asset management help for the surviving spouse. The marital deduction is a valuable estate tax avoidance tool for married couples.

However, estate tax law is not generous for non-spouse beneficiaries. Legislation passed in 2013 allowed individuals to leave assets totaling $5 million in value (indexed to inflation since 2011) to non-spouse, non-charitable beneficiaries and then doubled this amount following the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act to $10 million. However, if additional legislation is not passed before the sunset date of January 1, 2026, this amount will be cut in half.

In 2013, Congress made the portability of a spouse’s estate tax exemption permanent. This allows the surviving spouse to capture and use the first decedent spouse’s remaining estate tax exemption and the surviving spouse’s own exemption. To capture this estate tax exemption, an estate tax return must be filed in a timely manner after the death of the first spouse.

If spouses have a total estate exceeding available exemptions, they may use what is known as the “Credit Shelter Trust Planning” or “Optimal Marital Deduction Planning.” A trust is established, funded with assets of the first spouse to die, to use the spouse’s estate tax exemption. Assets in the trust are available to the surviving spouse for life but are not included in the survivor’s taxable estate upon their death. The goal benefits the surviving spouse and reduces any estate tax to maximize benefits for the children and grandchildren.

Another frequently used tool is the “disclaimer” plan, which allows the survivor to move certain assets into a trust for the survivor’s benefit rather than receiving assets directly. For married couples with estates valued at less than their available estate tax exemptions, a disclaimer plan provides the “all to spouse” plan and the option to implement a tax-advantaged trust. All assets are left to the survivor; then, based on the value of the first spouse’s estate, the surviving spouse may choose to disclaim the first spouse’s assets and divert them to a tax-advantaged trust.

Married couples should take advantage of the estate tax exemptions available to them to help protect a surviving spouse financially. It must be noted that there is no “one-size-fits-all” plan for married couples who wish to care for their surviving spouse, children, and grandchildren. It’s important to understand the basic estate tax avoidance or mitigation tools to create an estate plan to consider the couple’s planning goals and values. An experienced estate planning attorney can create a comprehensive estate plan to suit each family’s needs. If you would like to learn more about the estate tax, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: The National Law Review (June 24, 2023) “Basic Estate Tax Planning for Married Couples: Opportunities For Use Of Estate Tax Exemptions”

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Essential Estate Planning Documents every Caregiver Needs

Essential Estate Planning Documents every Caregiver Needs

Being a caregiver for a loved one can be one of the most emotionally challenging things you can do. There are so many aspects of your loved ones life that you are suddenly responsible for managing. So many important discussions about estate planning and writing a will are emotionally challenging as they ask those involved to come face-to-face with their mortality. But these are important discussions, says a recent article, “Elder Law Guys: All the documents to have in place when you’re an adult caregiver,” from Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The sooner these conversations take place, the better. There are some essential estate planning documents every caregiver needs to have available.

Here are the documents needed:

General Durable Power of Attorney. The financial POA is the most essential estate planning document. An agent is named to stand in for the parent or other person and make all financial and legal decisions. Name not just one but two successor agents to serve if the primary agent cannot or will not serve when needed. If no POA or agent can serve, the family will need to petition the court to have a judge name a guardian to manage the person’s financial affairs. There’s no guarantee that the court will name a family member. POA law varies by state, so speak with an estate planning attorney to ensure the POA permits the specific actions you want the agent to be able to take.

Durable Healthcare Power of Attorney and a Living Will. In some estate planning practices, these two documents are combined, while in others, they are separate. For the Healthcare POA, an agent is named to make health care decisions for the person. It’s advised to name two successor agents in case the primary person cannot or does not wish to serve in this capacity.

A Living Will contains the person’s wishes regarding receiving life-sustaining treatment in the event they can’t make their own decisions and the treating physician has determined the patient is either suffering from an irreversible coma, is in a persistent vegetative state, or an end-stage medical condition not survivable even with treatment.

Last Will and Testament and Trusts. The last will and trusts both dictate how property will pass, but the will directs how property is passed upon death. A trust contains provisions to manage assets during a person’s lifetime. Assets owned by a trust don’t go through probate, so they transfer directly to beneficiaries, and their value and the identity of beneficiaries remain private.

Suppose there are family members who are disabled. In that case, the estate plan should include a Supplemental Needs Trust to hold any inheritance from a disabled beneficiary who receives needs-based government benefits. Otherwise, the disabled recipient will become ineligible for government benefits. Depending on the circumstances, parents may want assets to be held in trust for other beneficiaries until they can manage their inheritances wisely.

Asset Protection Trust. An irrevocable Asset Protection Trust holds assets to shelter them from the cost of long-term care and can reduce or eliminate estate taxes for beneficiaries. An estate planning attorney will know which type of Asset Protection Trust will be most effective for your situation.

Beneficiary Designation Forms. All accounts or assets with beneficiary designations should be reviewed to be sure the named beneficiary is correct.

These essential estate planning documents should be stored in a known location so the may be available for a caregiver to access, if they need. Documents must be reviewed every three to five years to ensure they align with the parent’s wishes. Estate and tax laws change, relationships change, and people move and pass on, so it’s important to keep these documents updated. If you would like to learn more about the role of a caregiver, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (July 8, 2023) “Elder Law Guys: All the documents to have in place when you’re an adult caregiver”

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Information in our blogs is very general in nature and should not be acted upon without first consulting with an attorney. Please feel free to contact Texas Trust Law to schedule a complimentary consultation.
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