Category: Life Insurance

Risks of Adding a Child as a Life Insurance Beneficiary

Risks of Adding a Child as a Life Insurance Beneficiary

Life insurance is a critical part of family financial planning, ensuring that your loved ones are taken care of financially when you’re no longer around. A common approach many parents consider is adding their child’s name as a life insurance beneficiary, believing it to be a straightforward way to secure their child’s future. However, this decision carries unexpected complications and risks that many are unaware of. There are hidden risks of adding your child as a life insurance beneficiary.

At first glance, naming your minor child as a beneficiary on your life insurance policy seems like a caring gesture. It’s natural to want to provide for your children’s future directly. However, this well-intentioned move can lead to unforeseen legal and financial hurdles.

Minors are not legally allowed to receive life insurance benefits directly, says Policygenius in an article titled “Naming a child as a life insurance beneficiary.” If a minor is named as a beneficiary, the death benefit payout is delayed until a court appoints a custodian to manage the funds, which can take months. The surviving parent or a guardian named in your will is often appointed as the guardian. During this time, your child would not have access to the financial support you intended, potentially impacting their immediate needs.

Once an adult custodian is appointed, they can only use the money for court-approved expenses, such as living expenses and education. Your child might only access the funds at age 18. This process delays support and limits how the funds are used, contrary to your wishes.

Setting up a trust is the best way to ensure that your child benefits from your life insurance policy without legal entanglements or delays. Creating a trust for your minor child allows you to control how and when the benefits are distributed. You can specify conditions, such as funds for specific types of education, vacations, or an allowance, ensuring that the money supports your child in the most beneficial ways. This setup avoids the need for court intervention, providing a smoother transition of financial support.

While not all families choose to create a trust, naming an adult custodian or guardian for minor children is an essential step for estate planning. Appointing a guardian ensures that the person(s) you choose will both raise your children according to your wishes and financially manage the insurance policy death benefit on behalf of your child until they reach adulthood. Selecting a trusted individual for this role is crucial, since they will have significant control over your child’s financial and caregiving support.

Naming your spouse as the primary beneficiary, with a trust as the secondary, ensures that your spouse can manage household finances and support your child’s future if you’re no longer there. It’s essential to regularly review and update your life insurance beneficiaries to reflect life changes, ensuring that your policy aligns with your current wishes.

Adding a child’s name as a life insurance beneficiary might seem like a simple way to secure their future, but it comes with risks. By considering alternatives, like trusts or adult custodians, you can ensure that your child receives the support you intend without unnecessary legal hurdles or delays. If you would like to learn more about life insurance and estate planning, please visit our previous post. 

Reference: Policygenius (Aug. 17, 2023) “Naming a child as a life insurance beneficiary”

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Divorce Impacts your Estate Plan

Divorce Impacts your Estate Plan

Divorce is a life-altering event that significantly impacts various aspects of life, including your estate plan. Clients either going through a divorce or have recently finalized one often feel uncertain about how the divorce will affect their estate. This article shares crucial aspects of revising your estate plan after a divorce, ensuring that your assets and loved ones are protected according to your current wishes.

When you get divorced, updating your estate plan is imperative, as your ex-spouse may still be entitled to certain benefits. Your estate, which includes all assets owned, might still be accessible to your ex-spouse unless changes are made. Revising your estate plan ensures that your assets are distributed according to your updated preferences. Updating your will is essential after a divorce. Your ex-spouse may still be named as the executor or beneficiary. By revising your will, you can ensure that your estate is administered by someone you trust and that your assets are distributed according to your latest intentions.

Revoking your power of attorney is a critical step post-divorce. Your ex-spouse may be able to make financial and care decisions on your behalf. It’s advisable to appoint someone you trust to handle these matters, ensuring that your affairs are managed according to your current preferences.

Beneficiary designations are often overlooked during estate planning after divorce. It’s crucial to revise these as your ex-spouse might still be listed as a beneficiary on life insurance policies, retirement accounts and other financial instruments. Updating these designations is a simple yet essential step in ensuring that your estate is distributed according to your current wishes. Your ex-spouse is likely named as a trustee or beneficiary if you have a living trust. Post-divorce, you need to revise this document to reflect your current wishes. This might include appointing a new trustee or changing the beneficiaries.

If you have minor children, your estate plan probably includes guardianship designations. Post-divorce, reassess these choices. You might want to name someone other than your ex-spouse as the guardian, ensuring that your children’s care aligns with your current wishes.

State law and the terms of your divorce decree can impact your estate plan. Understanding these implications and ensuring that your estate plan complies with legal requirements is important. An experienced estate planning attorney can provide valuable insights and guidance.

Don’t wait until the divorce is finalized. Start updating your estate plan as soon as the divorce is pending. This proactive approach ensures that your interests are protected throughout the divorce process.

Divorce significantly affects your estate plan, and it’s crucial to take timely action to revise it. Remember, updating your estate plan post-divorce is not just a legal necessity; ensuring that your assets and loved ones are protected according to your current wishes is crucial. Don’t hesitate to seek professional assistance to navigate this complex process. If you would like to read more about estate planning post divorce, please visit our previous posts. 

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Life Insurance is vital to Estate Planning

Life Insurance is vital to Estate Planning

Life insurance is vital to comprehensive estate planning. Integrating life insurance policies into estate planning can provide financial security for your heirs and ensure that your estate is distributed according to your wishes. When used effectively, life insurance can solve a range of estate planning challenges, from providing immediate cash flow to beneficiaries to helping cover estate tax liabilities.

Incorporating life insurance into your estate plan requires careful consideration of the type of policy that best suits your needs, whether term life insurance for temporary coverage or whole life insurance for permanent protection. It’s essential to understand the insurance company’s role in managing these policies and ensuring that they align with your overall estate objectives.

Life insurance can play a crucial role in estate planning. It can provide a death benefit to cover immediate expenses after your passing, such as funeral costs and debts, thereby alleviating financial burdens on your heirs. Furthermore, life insurance proceeds can be used to pay estate taxes, ensuring that your beneficiaries receive their inheritance without liquidating other estate assets.

When selecting life insurance for estate planning purposes, it’s important to consider the different types of policies available, such as term insurance for short-term needs and permanent insurance for long-term planning. An insurance agent can be a valuable resource in this process, helping to determine the right policy type for your estate planning goals.

Term life insurance offers coverage for a specified period and is often used for short-term estate planning needs, such as providing financial support to minor children. On the other hand, permanent life insurance policies, like whole life or universal life insurance, offer lifelong coverage and can build cash value over time, which can be an asset in your overall estate.

Life insurance trusts, particularly irrevocable life insurance trusts (ILITs), play a significant role in estate planning. By placing a life insurance policy within a trust, you can exert greater control over how the death benefit is distributed among your beneficiaries. The trust owns the policy, removing it from your taxable estate and potentially reducing estate tax liabilities.

Since the trust is irrevocable, it provides a layer of protection against creditors and legal judgments, ensuring that the life insurance payout is used solely for the benefit of your designated beneficiaries.

When considering life insurance in estate planning, it’s important to evaluate how the death benefit of a life insurance policy will impact your estate’s overall financial picture and the inheritance your heirs will receive. The proceeds from a life insurance policy are typically not subject to federal income tax. However, they can still be included in your gross estate for estate tax purposes, depending on the ownership of the policy.

One of the primary uses of life insurance in estate planning is to provide funds to pay estate taxes. This is especially relevant for larger estates that may face significant federal and state estate taxes. The death benefit from a life insurance policy can be used to cover these taxes, ensuring that your heirs do not have to liquidate other estate assets to meet tax obligations. In planning for estate taxes, working with professionals, such as estate attorneys and tax advisors, is essential to ensure that your life insurance coverage aligns with your anticipated tax liabilities.

Life insurance can offer substantial financial support to your heirs and beneficiaries upon your passing. Whether providing for a spouse, children, or other dependents, life insurance can ensure that your loved ones are cared for financially. This is particularly important in cases where other estate assets are not readily liquid or if you wish to leave a specific inheritance to certain beneficiaries.

When selecting life insurance for this purpose, consider the needs of your heirs, their ability to manage a large sum of money and how the death benefit will complement other aspects of your estate plan.

In conclusion, life insurance plays a vital role in comprehensive estate planning. By carefully selecting the right type of policy, designating appropriate beneficiaries and considering the use of trusts, you can ensure that your estate plan effectively addresses your financial goals and provides for your loved ones after your passing. If you would like to learn more about life insurance and estate planning, please visit our previous posts. 

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Life Insurance should be Major component of Estate Plan

Life Insurance should be Major component of Estate Plan

We never know what the future may bring, and waiting too long to investigate life insurance could leave loved ones in a financial bind, according to a recent article from Money, “What Is Joint Life Insurance and How Does It Work?” There are plans ranging from term and whole to individual and joint, and you’ll want to understand how each works before determining which policy best fits your needs. Life insurance should be a major component of your estate plan.

Joint life insurance is a single plan covering the lives of two people with one premium, with the policyholders becoming each other’s beneficiaries or passing benefits to their heirs. Depending on your coverage, these types of life insurance pay out death benefits when one or both of the policyholders dies.

This eliminates the need for separate policies for spouses or partners and minimizes paperwork and the underwriting and administrative costs associated with life insurance policies. This type of plan is often used for business partners, who can use the death benefit to fund the company if one of them dies unexpectedly.

Joint life insurance plans are usually permanent or whole-life policies and stay in effect as long as premiums continue to be paid or until the policy pays out. Investing in joint whole life insurance has certain advantages because it provides long-term certainty.

There are two kinds of joint life insurance-first to die and second to die.

A first-to-die life insurance policy pays a death benefit to the surviving policyholder when the other party dies. This ensures the living policyholder receives a payout, which can be used for living costs if the family’s primary income source is the first to die.

Situations where one spouse doesn’t qualify for life insurance may also make first-to-die life insurance a good idea. Insurance companies may be more willing to insure someone with pre-existing health conditions because there’s only one payout between two policyholders. However, the healthier spouse will most likely incur higher cost premiums with a joint policy than an individual plan.

The first-to-die joint policy terminates once the payout occurs, leaving the surviving spouse or partner without life insurance unless they have an additional individual plan. If the surviving party doesn’t have their own policy, they must purchase a separate policy to ensure their beneficiaries receive a death benefit.

Second-to-die life insurance, or survivorship life insurance, doesn’t pay out until both policyholders die. These plans are often used to leave money for beneficiaries or pay for funeral expenses. A second-to-die policy can be helpful with estate planning because heirs don’t pay estate tax on the death benefits unless they exceed estate tax thresholds.

Determining which policy best suits your family depends on several factors, including how you expect beneficiaries to use the proceeds. Life insurance policies should be a major component of the discussion with your estate planning attorney, and align with your overall estate plan. If you would like to read more about life insurance, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Money (Sep. 15, 2023) “What Is Joint Life Insurance and How Does It Work?”

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The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 5

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 9 is out now!

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 9 is out now!

All good musicians eventually have a Greatest Hits album. We’ve got one too!

We send our blog out most business days and we track which blog entries are the most popular. The posts we did on the new tax rules regarding “Grantor Trusts” and our article on “How to Leave Assets to Minors” were the BIG Winners. Given how popular each of the posts were, we have dedicated an entire episode of our podcast to them.

In this edition of The Estate of the Union, Brad Wiewel expands on both of these topics in a way that makes them a bit easier to understand and perhaps implement.

 

 

In each episode of The Estate of The Union podcast, host and lawyer Brad Wiewel will give valuable insights into the confusing world of estate planning, making an often daunting subject easier to understand. It is Estate Planning Made Simple! The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 9 is out now! The episode can be found on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you get your podcasts. If you would prefer to watch the video version, please visit our YouTube page. Please click on the links below to listen to or watch the new installment of The Estate of The Union podcast. We hope you enjoy it.

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 4 – How To Give Yourself a Charitable Gift is out now!

 

Texas Trust Law focuses its practice exclusively in the area of wills, probate, estate planning, asset protection, and special needs planning. Brad Wiewel is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We provide estate planning services, asset protection planning, business planning, and retirement exit strategies.

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When Life Insurance becomes Taxable

When Life Insurance becomes Taxable

A life insurance policy benefit is usually paid to the beneficiary in a lump sum, which isn’t taxable. However, there are situations when life insurance becomes taxable.

A life insurance beneficiary may receive the policy amount in installments. If so, the benefit is placed into an account that can accrue interest. While the beneficiary won’t pay taxes on the benefit itself, they’ll be responsible for paying income taxes on any interest accrued.

Fed Manager’s recent article, “When Is Life Insurance Taxable? Four Scenarios to Consider,” gives the example of Jenny being the beneficiary of a $500,000 death benefit that earns 10% interest for one year before being paid out. She’ll owe income taxes on the $50,000 in interest growth.

The death benefit of a life insurance policy is usually paid directly to the beneficiaries named. If the benefit is included in the estate, it’s subject to potential federal and state estate taxes if it is above the tax exemption amount. About a dozen states have state estate taxes with exemptions, so if the death benefit amount is above these exemptions, any amount above the threshold would be subject to estate taxes.

A life insurance death benefit would be subject to taxes in the event of a taxable gift. This happens when three people serve three different roles in connection to the policy:

  • The policyholder is the individual who bought the policy and is responsible for payment of the premiums
  • The insured is the person whose life is covered by the policy and
  • The beneficiary who receives the death benefit when the insured passes away.

Assume that Tommy buys a life insurance policy for his wife, Tilly. They designate their son Teddy as the beneficiary. If Tilly dies and Teddy receives the death benefit, the IRS considers this a taxable gift from Tommy to Teddy because Tommy was the policyholder. In this situation, Tommy may have to pay gift taxes for any benefit amount that exceeds federal gift tax exemption limits.

The annual gift exclusion is $17,000 per individual. The lifetime limit is $12.92 million per individual. (These “numbers” are for 2023 and are adjusted for inflation.) To avoid this, Tilly could purchase and make payments on a policy herself, with Teddy still named as the beneficiary. Work closely with your estate planning attorney and financial advisors to understand when a life insurance policy becomes taxable and how to avoid the unnecessary financial headache. If you would like to learn more about life insurance and estate planning, please visit our previous posts.  

Reference: Fed Manager (April 25, 2023) “When Is Life Insurance Taxable? Four Scenarios to Consider”

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Important to Evaluate your Planning before a Second Marriage

Important to Evaluate your Planning before a Second Marriage

Second marriage, goes the saying, is the triumph of hope over experience. It’s a happy event for everyone, but different from the first time around. You might have created an estate plan during your first marriage. Still, chances are your life is a lot more complicated this time, especially if you both have children from prior marriages and more assets than when you were first starting out as a young adult. It is important to evaluate your planning before a second marriage. This is why a recent article from The Bristol Press is aptly titled “Plan your estate before you remarry.”

Here are some pointers to protect you and your new spouse-to-be:

Take an inventory of all assets and liabilities. This includes assets and debts, life insurance policies, retirement plans, credit card debt and anything you own. It’s important to be open and honest about your debts and assets, so that both people know exactly what they are marrying. Once you are married, you may be liable for your partner’s debts. Your credit scores may be impacted as well.

Decide how you are going to handle finances. Once you know what your partner is bringing to the marriage, you’ll want to make clear, unemotional decisions about how you’ll address your wealth. Are you willing to combine all of your assets? Do you want to keep your investment accounts separate?

For example, if one person is selling a home to move into the home owned by the other person, what costs, if any, will they contribute to the cost of the house? If one person has significant debt, do you want to combine finances or make joint purchases? These are not always easy issues. However, they shouldn’t be ignored.

Decide what you want to happen when you die. You and your future spouse should meet with an experienced estate planning attorney to create a will, Power of Attorney, Health Care Proxy and other documents. This lets you map exactly where you want your assets to go when you die. If there are children from prior marriages, you’ll want to ensure they are not disinherited when you die. This can be addressed through a number of options, including creating a trust for your children, making them beneficiaries of life insurance policies, or giving children joint ownership of property.

Even if there are no children, there may be family heirlooms or items with sentimental value you want to keep in the family, perhaps passing to a cousin, nephew, or niece. Discuss this with your future spouse and ensure that it’s included in your will.

Meet with an estate planning attorney. You should take this step even if you don’t have many assets. If you have children, it’s even more important. You’ll want to update your will and any other estate planning documents. If you have significant assets, you may decide to have a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement. The estate planning attorney will also help you determine whether you need a trust to protect your children.

If you had planning done in the past, it is important to sit down with an estate planning attorney to evaluate it in before to a second marriage. If you would like to learn more about estate planning for blended families, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: The Bristol Press (July 14, 2023) “Plan your estate before you remarry”

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Take Care when using a Self-Directed IRA

Take Care when using a Self-Directed IRA

For some people, a self-directed IRA could be a great vehicle in which to invest tax-advantaged retirement funds in real property. However, there are rules governing everything from property ownership and usage to how you cover expenses and take profits. If they aren’t followed, you can easily run afoul of the IRS. Take care when using a self-directed IRA.

Forbes’ recent article entitled “How To Use A Self-Directed IRA For Real Estate Investing” explains that a real estate IRA is just another name for a self-directed IRA that’s designed to hold investment property. You can own a wide range of property types in a real estate IRA. This includes land, single and multi-family homes, international property, boat docks, commercial properties and more. Because this is a type of self-directed IRA, the custodian—the company safeguarding your account and enforcing IRS regulations—allows you to hold alternative asset classes, like real estate.

First, find a custodian that allows or even specializes in real estate IRAs. Next, you need to fund your account—typically with a rollover from an existing IRA. With your cash in place, you can buy real estate and have it titled in the name of your IRA. You can finance real estate in your IRA with an investment property-specific mortgage. You can then pay the mortgage using additional cash from your self-directed IRA. When you sell a property held in a real estate IRA, the funds stay in the account. Depending on the type of IRA you’ve selected, those funds grow tax-deferred (traditional IRA) or tax-free (Roth IRA).

A real estate IRA allows you to diversify away from stocks and bonds. However, there are many rules governing this specialized type of account. Let’s look at some of the key rules you must know:

Property Title. Real estate that is held in a self-directed IRA is owned by the account, rather than by you personally. Therefore, the title documents that confirm ownership of the property are in the name of your IRA, rather than in your name.

Expenses and Income. All expenses and income flow into and out of your real estate IRA. All property taxes, utility bills and other expenses are paid by your account. All rental income or other income is paid back into your account.

Limitations on Use. Real estate held in a self-directed IRA can only be an investment property. You and any member of your family—plus any of your beneficiaries or fiduciaries—are referred to as disqualified persons. Since the purpose of an IRA is retirement investing, these disqualified persons can’t make use of the real estate assets.

No DIY. If you need to fix up or repair property held in a real estate IRA, the account must pay for the work. It can’t be performed by a disqualified person (you).

Prior Property Ownership. You can’t sell, lease, or exchange property you already own to your real estate IRA. That’s called “self-dealing,” which the IRS strictly prohibits.

Watch Out for the UBIT. If you take out a loan that’s secured by the property itself (a non-recourse loan), you will be required to pay unrelated business income tax (UBIT) on any profits related to the financed portion. However, you can use depreciation and operating costs to reduce your tax bill, which can allow you to reduce your UBIT or eliminate it altogether.

A self-directed IRA can be a wonderful tool to utilize retirement funds for real estate, but take care when using it. If you would like to learn more about retirement accounts and estate planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Forbes (Feb. 13, 2023) “How To Use A Self-Directed IRA For Real Estate Investing”

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Naming a Secondary Beneficiary is critical

Naming a Secondary Beneficiary is critical

Naming a secondary beneficiary is critical to ensuring your assets go where you want them. A secondary beneficiary, sometimes called a contingent beneficiary, is a person or entity entitled to receive assets from an estate or trust after the estate owner’s death, if the primary beneficiary is unable or unwilling to accept the assets. Secondary beneficiaries can be relatives or other people, but they can also be trusts, charities or other organizations, as explained in the recent article titled “What You Need to Know About Secondary or Contingent Beneficiaries” from yahoo! life.

An estate planning lawyer can help you decide whether you need a secondary beneficiary for your estate plan or for any trusts you create. Chances are, you do.

Beneficiaries are commonly named in wills and trust documents. They are also used in life insurance policies and in retirement accounts. After the account owner dies, the assets are distributed to beneficiaries as described in the legal documents.

The primary beneficiary is a person or entity with the first claim to assets. However, there are times when the primary beneficiary does not accept the assets, can’t be located, or has predeceased the estate owner.

A secondary beneficiary will receive the assets in this situation. They are also referred to as the “remainderman.”

In many cases, more than one contingent beneficiary is named. Multiple secondary beneficiaries might be entitled to receive a certain percentage of the value of the entire estate. More than one secondary beneficiary may also be directed to receive a portion of an individual asset, such as a family home.

Estate planning attorneys may even name an additional set of beneficiaries, usually referred to as tertiary beneficiaries. They receive assets if the secondary beneficiaries are not available or unwilling to accept the assets. In some cases, estate planning attorneys name a remote contingent beneficiary who will only become involved if all of the primary, secondary and other beneficiaries can’t or won’t accept assets.

For example, a person may specify their spouse as the primary beneficiary and children as secondary beneficiaries. A more remote relative, like a cousin, might be named as a tertiary beneficiary, while a charity could be named as a remote contingent beneficiary.

Almost any asset can be bequeathed by naming beneficiaries. This includes assets like real estate (in some states), IRAs and other retirement accounts, life insurance proceeds, annuities, securities, cash and other assets. Secondary and other types of beneficiaries can also be designated to receive personal property including vehicles, jewelry and family heirlooms.

Naming a secondary beneficiary is critical to ensuring that your wishes as expressed in your will are going to be carried out even if the primary beneficiary cannot or does not wish to accept the inheritance. Lacking a secondary beneficiary, the estate assets will have to go through the probate process. Depending on the state’s laws, having a secondary beneficiary avoids having the estate distribution governed by intestate succession. Assets could go to someone who you don’t want to inherit them!

Talk with your estate planning attorney about naming secondary, tertiary and remote beneficiaries. If you would like to learn more about beneficiaries, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: yahoo! life (Jan. 4, 2023) “What You Need to Know About Secondary or Contingent Beneficiaries”

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Situations where Beneficiaries may pay Taxes on Life Insurance

Situations where Beneficiaries may pay Taxes on Life Insurance

While death benefits are usually tax-free, there are a few situations where the beneficiary of a life insurance policy may have to pay taxes on the lump sum payout. When people purchase life insurance policies, they designate a beneficiary who will benefit from the policy’s proceeds. When the life insurance policyholder dies, the policy’s beneficiary then receives a payout known as the death benefit.

Yahoo Finance’s recent article entitled “Will My Beneficiaries Pay Taxes on Life Insurance?” says the big advantage of buying a life insurance policy is that, upon death, your beneficiaries can get a substantial lump sum payment without taxation, unless the amount of the life insurance pushes your estate above the applicable federal estate tax exemption. In that case, your estate will need to pay the tax.

When you earn income from interest, it’s typically taxable. Therefore, if the beneficiary decides to delay the payout instead of receiving it right away, the death benefit may continue to accumulate interest. The death benefit won’t be taxed. However, the beneficiary will typically pay taxes on the additional interest.

If a life insurance policyholder decides to name their estate as the death benefit beneficiary, the estate could be subject to taxation. When you don’t designate a person as your beneficiary, the proceeds from the life insurance policy are subject to Section 2024 of the IRS code. That says if the gross estate incorporates proceeds of a life insurance policy, the value of a life insurance policy must be payable to the estate directly or indirectly or to named beneficiaries (if you had any “incidents of ownership” throughout the policy term).

The proceeds of a life insurance policy may also pass to the estate if the beneficiary dies, and there are no contingent beneficiaries. If you have a will in place, the proceeds will be paid out according to the terms of the will. If there’s no will in place, the probate court decides the way in which to distribute your assets.

The individual insured on a life insurance policy and the policyholder are usually the same person. The policyholder then names a beneficiary. However, a gift tax may apply if the insured, the policyholder and the beneficiary are three different parties. Because the IRS assumes the death benefit was a gift from the policyholder to the beneficiary, you might have to pay gift taxes on the death benefit.

Beneficiaries usually won’t have to pay taxes on life insurance proceeds. However, beneficiaries may encounter some situations where life insurance proceeds can result in taxes. Be sure that your beneficiary designations are clearly outlined in the policy to avoid taxation. If you would like to learn more about life insurance and estate planning, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: Yahoo Finance (Jan. 17, 2023) “Will My Beneficiaries Pay Taxes on Life Insurance?”

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Information in our blogs is very general in nature and should not be acted upon without first consulting with an attorney. Please feel free to contact Texas Trust Law to schedule a complimentary consultation.
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