Category: Business Succession Planning

Key Estate Planning Strategies for Executives

Key Estate Planning Strategies for Executives

Executives manage complex financial landscapes while striving for professional success, creating unique estate planning goals and challenges. Central Trust Company shared insights in the article “Estate Planning For Executives,” which focused on liquidity concerns, tax efficiency and beneficiaries for certain assets. This article explores key estate planning strategies for executive’s unique goals.

Executives often face liquidity challenges and may have a significant portion of their wealth tied up in company stock. Diversifying investments and implementing strategies to manage concentrated stock positions are critical to mitigate risk and enhance financial security.

Navigating tax-efficient giving strategies is essential for executives looking to give back to their communities or support charitable causes. Estate planning considerations, including lifetime gifts and the transfer of vested stock options, play a crucial role in preserving wealth and minimizing tax liabilities.

Transitioning from a successful career to retirement can be exciting and daunting for executives. Planning for retirement involves forecasting complex benefits, managing investment portfolios and ensuring a smooth transition from the accumulation phase to the distribution phase of their financial life.

Comprehensive estate planning for executives includes strategies that address their income tax bracket, estate tax rates and various types of investments. Strategies such as wills, trusts, powers of attorney (POAs) and advance directives are central to protecting an executive’s assets and support building wealth.

A knowledgeable and experienced estate planning attorney is central to a holistic plan that meets an executive’s goals, including:

  • Reducing taxes and taxable estate values.
  • Transferring stock options and other nuanced investments to heirs.
  • Preserving or building their wealth.

Key Estate Planning Strategies For Executives:

  • Address Unique Challenges: Consider liquidity, stock options, estate taxes and beneficiaries.
  • Maximize Tax-Efficiency: Explore tax-efficient strategies to preserve wealth.
  • Build a Comprehensive Plan: Include wills, trusts, and POAs to address diverse financial needs and goals.
  • Define Personal Objectives: Define personal philosophies and objectives to create a comprehensive plan that aligns with your vision for the future.

Given the complexities of their careers and wealth management needs, executives face unique financial and estate planning challenges. Addressing key concerns and defining personal objectives helps executives secure a financial future for themselves and their families. If you would like to learn more about estate planning for wealthy couples and families, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference:  Central Trust Company (July 19, 2023) “Estate Planning For Executives”

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Explore the Intricacies of Business Trusts

Explore the Intricacies of Business Trusts

Entrepreneurs often seek robust mechanisms to safeguard assets and navigate liability in the intricate landscape of business ownership. Enter the realm of business trusts—a lesser-known yet powerful tool entrepreneurs can leverage to secure their ventures. Based on SmartAsset’s article, What Is a Business Trust and How Does It Work, we’ll explore the intricacies of business trusts, uncovering their nuances and exploring their potential advantages and drawbacks.

At the heart of business trusts lies a fundamental premise: the delegation of authority to manage a beneficiary stake in a business. Functionally akin to individual or family trusts, business trusts serve as legal instruments facilitating asset management on behalf of the grantor.

A business trust holds the rights to an individual’s stake in a business entity. In a sense, the trust, as a legal entity, owns the business. With the potential to shield against taxes and liability, business trusts offer a compelling avenue for entrepreneurs seeking robust asset protection.

Creating a business trust typically starts with deliberations between involved parties and a trust lawyer. This legal instrument, a declaration of trust, formalizes the terms governing the trust’s operation.

Central to the trust’s dynamics is the fiduciary duty entrusted to the trustee—the individual responsible for managing the trust’s assets in the best interests of beneficiaries. This fiduciary obligation underscores the trustee’s paramount responsibility to act prudently and diligently.

Just as individual trusts come in various forms, business trusts exhibit diversity in structure and function. Here’s a breakdown of the primary categories:

  • Grantor Trust Characterized by the grantor’s control over trust assets and taxation, this trust type offers a self-contained framework for asset management.
  • Simple Trust Operating under IRS verification, this trust directly distributes profits to beneficiaries without accessing principal assets.
  • Complex Trust Offering greater flexibility, this trust type permits partial distribution of profits and contributions to external entities, such as charities.

While business trusts present enticing benefits—from liability protection to enhanced privacy—they pose certain challenges. Here’s a snapshot of the pros and cons:

Pros:

  • Liability Protection: Shields beneficiaries from individual liability, akin to LLCs or corporations.
  • Privacy Enhancement: Offers an additional layer of privacy in asset management.
  • Flexible Distribution Terms: Facilitates tailored distribution schedules for beneficiaries.

Cons:

  • Cost and Complexity: Establishing and maintaining a business trust can be expensive and legally intricate.
  • Legal Compliance Challenges: Navigating legal requirements and compliance hurdles can pose significant obstacles.
  • Lifetime Limitations: Business trusts are typically constrained by a maximum lifespan of 99 years, limiting multi-generational arrangements.

If you’re considering a business trust, the journey begins with competent legal guidance. Collaborate with a trust lawyer to navigate the intricacies of trust creation and ensure alignment with your business goals and objectives.

While establishing a business trust entails upfront costs and legal complexities, the potential benefits of asset protection and operational flexibility can be substantial. Before proceeding, it’s crucial to weigh the key considerations and assess the suitability of a business trust for your unique circumstances.

Business Trusts Key Takeaways:

  • Early Consultation is Key: Engage with a trust lawyer early in the process to navigate legal complexities and ensure alignment with your business objectives.
  • Deliberate Consideration is Essential: Thoroughly assess the pros and cons of a business trust, weighing factors such as cost, complexity, and compliance.
  • Tailored Solutions Yield Optimal Results: Customize your business trust to align with your unique needs, leveraging its flexibility to achieve optimal asset protection and operational efficiency.

If you are ready to explore the intricacies of business trusts, schedule a consultation with a seasoned estate planning attorney today. If you would like to learn more about business trusts, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: SmartAsset (April 19, 2023) “What Is a Business Trust and How Does It Work”

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Estate Planning should be a Major Consideration for Small Business Owners

Estate Planning should be a Major Consideration for Small Business Owners

Estate planning should be a major consideration for successful small business owners, especially if they intend to build generational wealth and create a legacy. The title of a recent article from Business Insider says it all: “You might not want to think about estate planning, but as a financial planner, I know it’s essential for small-business owners.”

There are more complex issues for business owners than employees for estate planning. Therefore, be sure to work with an experienced estate planning attorney who will create a plan to protect you, your family and your business. As you go through the process, keep these basics in mind:

Last Will and Testament. This document is the foundation of an estate plan, providing directions to the state probate court regarding your wishes for distributing assets. It also names a guardian responsible for minor children upon your passing. If you don’t have a will, assets are distributed according to your state’s intestacy laws, typically based on kinship. You can update and change your will throughout your lifetime, and it should be reviewed every three to five years.

Revocable Living Trust. Having a revocable living trust gives you more control over assets, which could be necessary to distribute business assets. A revocable living trust can be altered while you are living, so changes in your business can be reflected in the directions in the trust.

Financial Power of Attorney. This document is critical if you are the business owner who performs most of the financial tasks of your business. When a business owner becomes incapacitated, having someone named Power of Attorney gives the POA the ability to pay bills, make bank deposits and withdrawals, file business and personal taxes and make any other financial decisions you wish. POA can be limited if you only want someone to pay bills, or they can be broad, allowing the agent to do anything you would do to keep the business running while you are incapacitated. Your estate planning attorney can craft a POA to suit your needs.Benefi

Business Succession Plan. A business succession plan should be in place as soon as your business gains traction and becomes successful. Distributing shares of the business after you pass is fine. However, what if your heirs don’t have a clue how the business works? Do you want them to sell it after you pass or maintain it for the next generation? A succession plan requires the help of an estate planning attorney, CPA and financial professionals to create a management team, define roles, set performance guidelines, etc.

Digital Estate Plan. We spend so much time online. However, few have plans for our digital assets. If your business is online, has a website, and uses social media, online finances, and cell phones, you need a digital estate plan to identify assets and provide instructions on what you want to be done with those assets after you have passed.

Review Beneficiary Designations. Any account that can name a beneficiary, such as retirement plans, investment accounts, or life insurance policies, must be reviewed every few years or whenever a trigger event, including birth, death, divorce, or remarriage. Upon your passing, these assets will be passed directly to the beneficiary. Be sure the person you named twenty years ago on your life insurance policy is still the right person to receive proceeds upon your passing.

Estate planning should be a major consideration for successful small business owners. An experienced estate planning attorney can review your current estate plan to ensure that it covers all bases for you and your business. If you would like to learn more about planning for business owners, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: Business Insider (March 22, 2024) “You might not want to think about estate planning, but as a financial planner, I know it’s essential for small-business owners”

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Business Owners needs Succession Planning

Business Owners needs Succession Planning

Business owners typically have a high percentage of their net worth tied up in the business and sometimes the real estate where it operates. What’s surprising is how little attention is often given to the succession plan. Business owners need succession planning, says an article from Accounting Today, “The two sides to succession plans for private businesses.”

Starting with the operational side, who will take over the business owner’s work when they die, become incapacitated, or retire? If a business founder is in the weeds of the business, this is a big issue. The owner must have extensive conversations with key employees to discuss the details.

Multigenerational family ownership isn’t always the cure for a succession plan. Second- or third-generational roles must be planned, so capable people fill them. Bloodline succession doesn’t always work for running a business.

These conversations regarding roles, compensation and equity incentives must be very detailed. Not all employee leaders are willing to pour their lives into a privately owned business for the benefit of heirs without an incentive plan.

On the financial side of succession, who will become the owners of the deceased’s shares, and what financial arrangements will be made for that transfer? Businesses with the least amount of animosity and grief are those who have done the hard work: they have the business evaluated by an outside professional and having clear plans for how the successor owners will own and operate the business.

How will the transfer of the business take place in the future? An estate planning attorney should work with the business’ accountants, financial advisors, insurance brokers and other professionals to develop a clear plan for the business and the family.

If the owner is contemplating retirement, will they count on the income from the business operations to fund their retirement, or will they sell their shares to family members or outsiders? Who will oversee this transfer if the business owner becomes incapacitated?

Business owners needs succession planning for a privately held business. It is a lengthy process requiring input from skilled professionals, and ideally, it should begin the moment the business is well-established. There’s always time to tweak an existing plan, but never time to plan in an emergency. If you would like to learn more about business succession planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Accounting Today (Feb. 13, 2024) “The two sides to succession plans for private businesses”

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LLCs can be a useful Tool in your Estate Planning

LLCs can be a useful Tool in your Estate Planning

LLCs can be a useful tool in your estate planning. Limited liability companies, or LLCs, are used in estate planning to achieve estate tax savings and consolidate asset management, according to a recent article, “Estate Planning With Limited Liability Companies: Transfers of Business Interests as a Planning Opportunity,” from The National Law Review.

In many cases, the LLC is used as a business entity to facilitate gifting or transfers to children, often at discounted values, reducing the value of the donor’s assets, ultimately subject to gift and estate taxation. There are also non-tax benefits, as a properly structured LLC insulates owners from liability and provides an organizational control mechanism.

As a “manager-managed” entity, the management functions and authority over the LLC rests in designated or elected managers, as opposed to owners, also known as “members.” Separating management from ownership transfers some of the asset’s economic benefits, while retaining control over operations. Limiting managerial or voting rights also justifies using valuation discounts for the membership interests who lack control over the company, presenting a tax-planning opportunity.

An LLC offers several benefits:

  • A streamlined method of transferring ownership
  • Creating a structure for centralized management, control, and succession
  • Preserving family ownership through rights of purchase and first refusal
  • Establishing procedures to resolve internal family disputes
  • Gaining protection of LLC assets from claims asserted against owners
  • Gaining protection of owner assets from claims asserted against the LLC

Significant tax savings can be achieved through lifetime gifts of LLC interests because of valuation discounting and removing future appreciation from the donor’s estate. In addition, if transfers are made to trusts for the children, it may be possible to achieve even further benefits, including increased protection against lawsuits, dissolving marriages, and future estate taxes.

These are complex transactions requiring the knowledge of an experienced estate planning attorney and careful vetting by tax advisors. One downside to lifetime gifting: unlike assets passing as part of an estate, gifted assets do not receive a basis adjustment for income tax purposes at the time of the donor’s death. Another downside is that the donor generally cannot benefit economically from the assets after they are transferred. However, if the donor is concerned about divesting themselves of the transferred assets and the income, the transfer could be structured as a sale rather than a gift to provide increased cash flow back to the transferor.

A final note: if the LLC is not operated consistently with the entity’s non-tax business purposes, it may be vulnerable to attack by the IRS or third parties, undermining its benefits for estate tax planning and limited liability protection. The entity must be managed to support its valid business purpose as a legitimate enterprise. Remember, LLCs can be a useful tool for your estate planning, but only if it is properly created and maintained. If you would like to learn more about LLCs and business planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: The National Law Review (May 19, 2023) “Estate Planning With Limited Liability Companies: Transfers of Business Interests as a Planning Opportunity”

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Ideas to improve Business Succession Planning

Ideas to improve Business Succession Planning

Winter is a slower season for farmers and ranchers. It offers family business leaders time to plan for the future. A recent article from Progressive Farmer, “Family Business Matters: Eight Practical Succession Ideas,” lists ideas to improve business succession and estate planning efforts.

Update balance sheets. Families who own land passed through generations don’t always like to show the land at its current fair market value. Even if you intend to never sell the land, creating an estate plan requires an accurate valuation of all assets to minimize the consequences of estate and income taxes.

Chart ownership for the future. Family members often have no understanding of how they will achieve ownership of the business and its assets. Will it be a gift? Will there be taxes to pay? Or will it be a sale? Will they need to buy out non-farming family members? Without clear answers to these and related questions, people may find themselves operating on assumptions, which almost always leads to conflict or family fractures.

Start handing off management tasks sooner, not later. Plan for the transition by starting with discrete business functions. This could be as straightforward as making decisions about equipment, purchasing crop insurance, or enrolling in a Farm Service Agency. This gives the senior generation the ability to delegate and observe, while empowering and more fully engaging the next generation.

Refresh estate planning documents. People often neglect to update estate documents. Review wills, trusts, trustees, beneficiary designations, advance medical directives and power of attorney documents. Are the people named in various roles still appropriate? Does your estate still work, in light of changing tax laws? This should happen at least every three to five years.

Assess tax consequences of exiting the business. Part of retirement funding is the tax liability of leaving the family business. Deferred income, prepaid expenses and fully depreciated equipment can lead to significant tax exposure. Three to five years ahead of your departure, start mapping out a plan with your accountant, estate planning attorney and financial advisor.

Create a relationship between family members and landowners. If you rent property from an absentee landowner, those relationships will be vital to continuing the business. You may not be able to influence the landowner at the time of transition to the next generation. However, establishing relationships with family members who will take over for you can reduce friction.

Communicate the benefits family members will get from working together to maintain the business. Passing land from one generation to the next often means siblings or cousins become business partners, with undivided interests in the land or as shareholders or members of some legal entity. Family members who may not get along will benefit from having a “buy-sell agreement” in place. This spells out how partners can buy out each other’s interest if one or more family members want to sell. Talk with your estate planning attorney to establish an agreement in advance of anyone leaving the business to reduce the potential of family conflict.

These are just a few ideas to improve business succession planning. Discuss your goals with your family and your estate planning attorney so a solid plan is in place. If you are interested in reading more about succession planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Progressive Farmer (Jan. 1, 2023) “Family Business Matters: Eight Practical Succession Ideas”

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The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 6

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 5 is out now!

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 5 is out now!

Happy New Year! To kick off the first episode of 2023, host Brad Wiewel, sits down to discuss the Corporate Transparency Act and how it relates to trusts.

There is a Bad Moon Rising (to quote Creedence Clearwater Revival). The bad moon is the Corporate Transparency Act which is going to REQUIRE all LLCs, corporations and Limited Partnerships to register with the federal government! The law becomes effective January 1, 2024.

This podcast focuses on some of the provisions of the new law and the consequences and penalties for failure to comply. It is a MUST LISTEN if you or someone you know or work with has an entity, because this is SERIOUS STUFF!

In the podcast we mention that we have a new service we are providing called Business Shield . It is designed to maintain entities and keep them in compliance with both state, and now federal law. Simply click on Business Shield™ to be taken to the page on our website. Please let us know if you would like to discuss Business Shield™ with us and we’ll be happy to schedule a complimentary phone consultation with one of our attorneys.

In each episode of The Estate of The Union podcast, host and lawyer Brad Wiewel will give valuable insights into the confusing world of estate planning, making an often daunting subject easier to understand. It is Estate Planning Made Simple! The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 5 is out now! The episode can be found on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you get your podcasts. If you would prefer to watch the video version, please visit our YouTube page. Please click on the link below to listen to the new installment of The Estate of The Union podcast. We hope you enjoy it.

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 4 – How To Give Yourself a Charitable Gift is out now!

 

Texas Trust Law focuses its practice exclusively in the area of wills, probate, estate planning, asset protection, and special needs planning. Brad Wiewel is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We provide estate planning services, asset protection planning, business planning, and retirement exit strategies.

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Protect the Family Business for the Next Generation

Protect the Family Business for the Next Generation

The reality and finality of death is uncomfortable to think about. However, people need to plan for death, unless they want to leave their families a mess instead of a blessing. In a family-owned business, this is especially vital, according to a recent article, “All in the Family—Transition Strategies for Family Businesses” from Bloomberg Law. There are strategies you can use to protect the family business for the next generation.

The family business is often the family’s largest financial asset. The business owner typically doesn’t have much liquidity outside of the business itself. Federal estate taxes upon death need special consideration. Every person has an estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax exemption of $12.06 million, although these historically high levels may revert to prior levels in 2026. The amount exceeding the exemption may be taxed at 40%, making planning critical.

Assuming an estate tax liability is created upon the death of the business owner, how will the family pay the tax? If the spouse survives the business owner, they can use the unlimited marital deduction to defer federal estate tax liabilities, until the survivor dies. If no advance planning has been done prior to the death of the first spouse to die, it would be wise to address it while the surviving spouse is still living.

Certain provisions in the tax code may mitigate or prevent the need to sell the business to raise funds to pay the estate tax. One law allows the executor to pay part or all of the estate tax due over 15 years (Section 6166), provided certain conditions are met. This may be appropriate. However, it is a weighty burden for an extended period of time. Planning in advance would be better.

Business owners with a charitable inclination could use charitable trusts or entities as part of a tax-efficient business transition plan. This includes the Charitable Remainder Trust, or CRT. If the business owner transfers equity interest in the business to a CRT before a liquidity event, no capital gains would be generated on the sale of the business, since the CRT is generally exempt from federal income tax. Income from the sale would be deferred and recognized, since the CRT made distributions to the business owner according to the terms of the trust.

At the end of the term, the CRT’s remaining assets would pass to the selected charitable remainderman, which might be a family-established and managed private foundation.

Family businesses usually appreciate over time, so owners need to plan to shift equity out of the taxable estate. One option is to use a combination of gifting and selling business interests to an intentionally defective grantor trust. Any appreciation after the date of transfer may be excluded from the taxable estate upon death for purposes of determining federal estate tax liabilities.

For some business owners, establishing their business as a family limited partnership or limited liability company makes the most sense. Over time, they may sell or gift part of the interest to the next generation, subject to the discounts available for a transfer. An appraiser will need to be hired to issue a valuation report on the transferred interests in order to claim any possible discounts after recapitalizing the ownership interest.

The ultimate disposition of the family business is one of the biggest decisions a business owner must make, and there’s only one chance to get it right. Consult with an experienced estate planning attorney and don’t procrastinate in protecting the family business for the next generation. Succession planning takes time, so the sooner the process begins, the better. If you would like to learn more about succession planning, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: Bloomberg Law (Nov. 9, 2022) “All in the Family—Transition Strategies for Family Businesses”

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The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 4 – How To Give Yourself a Charitable Gift is out now!

 

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Include Your Business in Estate Planning

Include Your Business in Estate Planning

Have you made the decision to include your business in your estate planning? Forbes’ recent article entitled “The Importance of Estate Planning When Building Your Business” says that every business that’s expected to survive must have a clear answer to this question. The plan needs to be shared with the current owners and management as well as the future owners.

The common things business owners use to put some protection in place are buy-sell agreements, key-person insurance and a succession plan. These are used to make certain that, when the time comes, there’s both certainty around what needs to happen, as well as the funding to make sure that it happens.

If your estate plan hasn’t considered your business interests or hasn’t been updated as the business has developed, it may be that this plan falls apart when it matters the most.

Buy-sell insurance policies that don’t state the current business values could result in your interests being sold far below fair value or may see the interests being bought by an external party that threatens the business itself.

If your agreements are not in place, or are challenged by the IRS, your estate may find itself with a far greater burden than anticipated.

Your estate plan should be reviewed regularly to account for changes in your situation, the value of your assets, the status of your (intended) beneficiaries and new tax laws and regulations.

There are a range of thresholds, exemptions and rules that apply. Adapting the plan to make best use of these given your current situation is well worth the effort. Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney about your plan.

Include your business in your estate planning. This will provide valuable guidance in terms of how best to set up and manage your broader financial affairs.

Financial awareness can not only inform how you grow your wealth now but also ensure that it gets passed on effectively. The same is also true of your business.

A tough conversation about what happens in these situations can be a reminder to management that over dependence on any key person is not something to take for granted. If you would like to learn more about business succession planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Forbes (Sep. July 12, 2019) “The Importance of Estate Planning When Building Your Business”

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The Estate of The Union Season 2, Episode 3 – Mis-Titled Assets Can Wreck Your Planning out now!

 

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Business Owners need an Exit Strategy

Business Owners need an Exit Strategy

Letting go of a business is not easy, says a recent article titled “Estate Planning Strategies for Business Owners Planning an Exit” from CEOWorld Magazine. Where the exit is to sell the business or retire, or the result of an unexpected events, business owners need an exit strategy.

When should you establish a plan? It should be early, perhaps even when you become a CEO. A long-term strategy is as important as short-term decisions. Not having an estate plan could mean your interest in the business goes through probate, which is both public and time consuming. The business may never recover from the distribution of assets and the exposure. No estate plan also means missed changes to leverage discount gifting or any other tax-reduction strategies.

Consider the following when talking with your estate planning attorney:

What is the exit strategy—to sell, be acquired or merged, have a family member take over, or sell to key employees?

How much money to do you need and want at the exit? Do you want to create a stream of income or a lump sum?

Do you have a charitable giving plan to reap tax advantages and support an organization with meaning to you? Structuring a gift far in advance avoids using a reduced fair market value and have it deemed as a cash gift.

Transferring the business to family members instead of selling to outside parties creates many different planning opportunities. With family members, emotions come into play, even though this is not always productive. If some offspring are not involved in the business, will they receive a share of the business? Do you want to equalize your inheritance? Assets can be divided by the use of trusts, for example.

You’ll want to work with an estate planning attorney with experience in creating a succession plan with a tax model. This is often overlooked in succession planning and can cause significant cash flow management issues as well as lost tax benefits.

Determine if you want to make gifts using business interests or sales proceeds early on and whether these gifts will go to family members or charities. The earlier the planning occurs, the more you can maximize the income and estate tax benefits.

Clarify your own retirement needs and goals. Business owners often fail to correctly calculate the expected investment income on after-tax proceeds from the sale of the business. Will it be sustainable enough for the lifestyle you want in retirement? If not, is there a way to structure the sale of the business to achieve your financial goal?

Business owners need exit strategy, and the earlier the planning, the higher the likelihood of a successful transition. If you would like to read more about business succession planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: CEOWorld Magazine (Aug. 16, 2022) “Estate Planning Strategies for Business Owners Planning an Exit”

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The Estate of The Union Season 2, Episode 2 – The Consumer's Guide to Dying is out now!

 

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Information in our blogs is very general in nature and should not be acted upon without first consulting with an attorney. Please feel free to contact Texas Trust Law to schedule a complimentary consultation.
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