Category: Elder Care

A Living Will is a Huge Benefit

A Living Will is a Huge Benefit

Having a living will is a huge benefit for yourself and your loved ones. During a medical crisis, families frequently must make decisions quickly regarding whether to withhold or provide life-sustaining treatments. A living will is a part of advance care planning. It’s a legal document that provides specific instructions on how to carry out your wishes to receive or decline such treatments when you otherwise can’t communicate those wishes yourself, explains, Forbes’ recent article entitled “How Does A Living Will Work?”

Your estate plan may already include a durable power of attorney for health care, which is a legal document that lets your designated agent or proxy make medical decisions for you if you become incapacitated. However, unlike that document, the instructions in a living will can be used only when the person named in the living will has no hope of recovery or cure.

A living will provides limited authority to an agent on behalf of the principal who’s no longer able to communicate their preferences to withhold or withdraw artificial means of life support or life-sustaining treatments. A living will should have your wishes noted for receiving or going without treatment when your condition isn’t expected to improve and treatment would extend your life for only a limited time.

A living will is designed to apply only in very limited situations when the principal who signed the document has an incurable or irreversible medical condition or conditions that will most likely result in the principal’s death within a short period of time—typically six months or fewer.

Life-sustaining treatments addressed in a living will may include:

  • Ventilators
  • Heart-lung machines
  • Nutrition via a feeding tube
  • Hydration via feeding tube or IV
  • Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or other extraordinary measures; and
  • Dialysis.

Living wills can also address issues, like pain management and palliative care. You may even include provisions such as “I would prefer to die at home” in a living will.

Provide as much information as you can to make certain that your proxy isn’t making the decision for you, but rather your wishes and words are moving through your proxy. A living will is a huge benefit to your loved ones. The more information you can provide in your living will to your proxy to illustrate for them the type of care that you’d want to receive or decline, the better. If you would like to learn more about living wills and other medical directives, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Forbes (Aug. 18, 2022) “How Does A Living Will Work?”

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Planning for Long Term Care Is Important

Planning for Long Term Care Is Important

Elder law attorneys have far too many stories of people who fail to plan, plan incorrectly or incompletely, or plan to fail by doing nothing at all, as described in the article “Elder Care: People in a pickle” from The Sentinel. Planning for long term care is important. Here’s a sad story.

A woman calls the elder law office because her husband fell at home—a common occurrence among the elderly. He was hospitalized and is now receiving rehabilitation in a nursing home. The treating physician recommends that the husband remain in the nursing home because he has significant limitations and his wife, who has her own medical issues, isn’t physically able to care for him.

The wife agrees. However, she has a host of challenges to overcome that were never addressed. The husband took care of all of the finances, for decades telling his wife not to worry. Now, she has no idea what their resources are. Can they afford to pay for his nursing home care? She doesn’t know. Nor does she have the authority to access their accounts, because there are accounts in her husband’s name only and she does not have access to them.

Her husband’s insistence of being the only one in control of their finances has put her in a terrible predicament. Without the estate planning documents to give her access to everything, including his own accounts, she can’t act. Can he now sign a Power of Attorney? Maybe—but maybe not, if it can be shown he lacks capacity.

If the couple cannot pay the nursing home bill, they have given their children a problem, since they live in Pennsylvania, where the state’s filial support law allows the nursing home to sue one or more of the children for the cost of their parent’s care. (This law varies by state, so check with a local elder lawyer to see if it could impact your family). Even if the wife knew about the family’s finances and could apply for public benefits, in this case his eligibility would be denied, as they had purchased a home for one of their children within five years of his being moved to the nursing home. Medicaid has a five-year look back period, and any large transfers or purchases would make the husband ineligible for five years.

If this sounds like a financial, legal and emotional mess, it’s a fair assessment.

Unexpected events happen, and putting off planning for them, or one spouse insisting “I’ve got this” when truly they don’t, takes a big impact on the future for spouses and family members. All of the decisions we make, or fail to make, can have major impacts on the future for our loved ones.

Other situations familiar to elder lawyers: a parent naming two children as co-agents for power of attorney. When she began showing symptoms of dementia, the two children disagreed on her care and ended up in court.

A father has guardianship for a disabled adult son. He promised the son he’d always be able to live in the family home. The father becomes ill and must move into a nursing home. Neither one is able to manage their own personal finances, and no financial or practical arrangements were made to fulfill the promise to the son.

No one expects to have these problems, but even the most loving families find themselves snarled in legal battles because of poor planning. Careful planning for long term care is important. It may not reduce the messy events of life, but it can reduce the stress and expenses. By choosing to exert some control over who can help you with decisions and what plans are in place for the future, you can leave a legacy of caring. If you would like to learn more about long term care issues, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: The Sentinel (Aug. 19, 2022) “Elder Care: People in a pickle”

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Important to consider Long-Term Care Insurance

Important to consider Long-Term Care Insurance

It becomes especially important to plan for the future when the world around us seems so volatile and unpredictable. We can’t control future health care costs, but we can plan for them, says a recent article titled “Economic instability and the need to plan for long-term care” from The Indiana Lawyer. Failing to plan could mean lost assets and a lost legacy. It is important to consider long-term care insurance as you get older.

According to Genworth’s Cost of Care survey, from 2004 to 2021, the cost of long-term care has outpaced inflation by a large margin. Many of the increases were driven by supply and demand issues. There aren’t enough people to care for the growing population of people needing services, which will continue to be the case for at least the next decade. A total of 10,000 boomers turn 65 every day and 70% will require care and support services in their lifetimes.

How can assets be protected from long-term costs?

One of the most frequently used tools is an asset protection trust or an irrevocable trust. The irrevocable trust cannot be modified, amended, or terminated without permission of the grantor’s beneficiary or beneficiaries. Once the grantor transfers assets into the trust, the grantor no longer has the rights of ownership. The trust can be designed to minimize taxation, maximize access to long-term benefits and protect assets.

The trust must be drafted properly, so trust income and principal, if needed, can be accessed.

The timing is critical. Asset protection trusts must be created when there is no immediate health care crisis, and the grantor has no need for long-term care. The best trust is created when the person is in good health and of sound mind.

Those who are nearing retirement, passed retirement age or who may have health issues in the distant future and expect to need Medicaid in the future are best candidates for an asset protection trust.

Medicaid’s Five Year Look Back Period

Planning needs to be done at least five years in advance, as Medicaid looks at the applicant’s past five year’s finances to see if any assets were sold or gifted for under market value. Transferring assets to an irrevocable trust is treated as a gift and violates the five-year look back, making the person ineligible for Medicaid coverage. Nursing home care will have to be paid out-of-pocket until the person becomes eligible.

Asset protection strategies are available for those who need immediate protection of assets. However, they have to done quickly and correctly with an estate planning elder law attorney. People who have suffered a fall and have significant injuries or who have received a diagnosis of a difficult disease should speak with an elder law attorney in a timely manner. They’ll need to discuss preparing for a Medicaid application, what assets can be protected and steps they need to take. It is important to consider long-term care insurance before you reach a point when it is needed. The earlier the plan is put into place, the better. If you would like to learn more about long-term care insurance, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: The Indiana Lawyer (Aug. 3, 2022) “Economic instability and the need to plan for long-term care”

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Spotting early Dementia Symptoms is Critical

Spotting early Dementia Symptoms is Critical

It’s easy to miss the first signs of cognitive decline. Spotting early dementia symptoms is more critical than ever: the Alzheimer’s Association projects that 12.7 million people 65 and older will have some form of dementia by 2050. That’s why a lot of research on behavioral changes associated with dementia could help in the early detection of the neurodegenerative condition. However, this subtle action is often ignored by people with dementia and their families.

Yahoo’s recent article entitled “This Is the No. 1 Dementia Symptom People Ignore, Doctors Say” explains that many people believe that memory loss is the only sign of dementia. However, there’s much more to this debilitating condition than forgetfulness. There are a number of other behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with dementia, the most common of which are apathy, depression, irritability, agitation and anxiety. The rarest symptoms are euphoria, hallucinations and lack of inhibition. Many of these are subtle at first. Therefore, understanding what to look for is critical in early detection. It can significantly affect the course of your disease and delay its progression. This behavior change can be seen many years before a dementia diagnosis.

A 2020 study in JAMA Internal Medicine found, when looking at the medical records and consumer credit reports of more than 80,000 people aged 65 and older who were Medicare beneficiaries, people who developed dementia were significantly more likely to have financial problems and poor credit scores. These financial problems became more prevalent following a dementia diagnosis.

Monica Moreno, Senior Director of Care and Support at the Alzheimer’s Association, tells Best Life, “While there are several signs or symptoms of dementia, challenges with problem-solving or planning can cause a person to mismanage their finances. Other dementia-related symptoms that can adversely affect money management or personal finances include poor judgment and difficulty completing familiar tasks.”

The study concluded that missed bill payments lead to higher penalties and interest fees that are detrimental to your financial well-being. Therefore, financial guidance is essential for dementia patients after diagnosis.

“During the early stages of dementia, a person may be able to do simple tasks like paying bills but struggle with more complicated tasks, like managing investments or making a decision on large purchases,” explains Moreno. “Since dementia is often progressive, these challenges will increase over time. Therefore, family members need to identify these potential signs early and intervene as soon as possible.”

It’s important to spot financial behavior changes for early detection of dementia. Common signs include:

  • The inability to balance checking accounts
  • Consistently making late payments on credit cards; and
  • Overspending.

Moreno adds, “People with dementia are susceptible to fraud, including identity theft, insurance scams and get-rich-quick schemes. Allowing these problems or potential threats to go unaddressed can put individuals living with dementia [and their families] at great financial risk.”

Spotting early dementia symptoms is critical to protecting older adults and their families from the burden of unnecessary financial stress.

The JAMA Internal Medicine study advises, “Families should be counseled about the potential need to help with financial management following [dementia] diagnosis.” If you are interested in learning more about dementia and other cognitive disorders, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Yahoo! (Aug. 8, 2022) “This Is the No. 1 Dementia Symptom People Ignore, Doctors Say”

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Living Will and DNR are different Documents

Living Will and DNR are different Documents

A living will and a Do Not Resuscitate Order, known as a DNR, are very different documents. However, many people confuse the two. They both address end of life issues and are used in different settings, according to the article “One Senior Place: Know the difference between ‘living will’ and ‘do not resuscitate’” from Florida Today.

What is a Living Will?

A living will is a written statement describing a person’s wishes about receiving life-sustaining medical treatment in case of a terminal illness if they are a patient near death or in a persistent vegetative state. This includes choices such as whether to continue the use of artificial respiration, a feeding tube and other highly intensive means of keeping a person alive.

The living will is used to make your wishes clear to loved ones and to physicians. It is prepared by an estate planning elder care attorney, often when having an estate plan created or updated. To ensure it is valid and the instructions can be carried out, be sure to have this document created properly.

What is a DNR?

A DNR is a medical directive used to convey wishes to not be resuscitated in the event of respiratory or cardiac arrest. This document needs to be signed by both the patient and their treating physician. It’s often printed on brightly colored paper, so it can be easily found in an emergency.

The DNR should be placed in a location where it can be easily and quickly found. In nursing homes, this is typically at the head or foot of the bed. At home, it’s often posted on the refrigerator.

The DNR needs to be immediately available to ensure that the patient’s last wishes are honored.

A key mistake made by well-meaning family members is to have the DNR with someone else, rather than at home or at the bedside of the patient. If the DNR cannot be found and emergency medical responders arrive on scene, they are legally bound to provide CPR or other medical care to revive the patient.

When the DNR is available, the emergency responders will not initiate CPR if they find the patient in cardiopulmonary arrest or respiratory arrest. They may instead provide comfort care, including administering oxygen and pain management.

If a person is admitted to the hospital, their living will is placed on the chart. Depending on the state’s laws, a certain number of physicians must agree the patient is in a persistent vegetative state or has an end-state condition and can no longer communicate. At that point, the terms of the living will are followed.

In addition to having these documents created with your estate plan, make sure that family members know where they can be found. A living will and a DNR are different documents and your estate planning attorney can help you address which is the best option for your current situation. If you would like to learn more about living wills, DNRs and other medical directives, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: Florida Today (July 19, 2022) “One Senior Place: Know the difference between ‘living will’ and ‘do not resuscitate’”

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Geriatric Care Managers can make Life Easier

Geriatric Care Managers can make Life Easier

Geriatric care managers (or GCMs) help seniors deal with their burdens in an efficient, organized manner. Geriatric care managers can simply make life easier for both you and your senior, says Seniors Matter’s recent article entitled “What is a geriatric care manager?”

Seniors Matter created a guide to provide seniors with detailed information about geriatric care managers, including what they do and how to locate the most qualified individuals in your area. If you’re not sure about the role of a geriatric care manager, it can be broken down into two parts: First of all, “geriatric care” simply refers to geriatric medicine, which focuses on health care services for elderly individuals. The second part of the phrase is quite straightforward, since a “manager” is simply someone with strong organizational skills who is in charge of making important decisions.

Geriatric care managers are knowledgeable and organized individuals skilled in advocacy and care coordination for seniors. They are specialists in senior care who can guide family caregivers and others in providing the best support for their seniors. In fact, many family caregivers think of senior care managers as unofficial family members.

They’re people you can trust to make the right choices when it comes to eldercare services, and they often develop bonds with the entire family.

Geriatric care managers have strong qualifications. Many of them have professional experience in case management, physical therapy, nursing, social work, or occupational therapy. Some have worked as gerontologists. Note that a GCM doesn’t need to directly provide seniors with all of the medical treatment they need. A significant part of their role involves finding other qualified medical professionals and senior care providers who can offer more specialized assistance.

GCMs are especially helpful in long-distance care situations. They can ensure quick response times in the case of an emergency.

Even if the time commitment of informal caregiving isn’t an issue for you, a geriatric care manager can be a welcome source of advice, guidance, and advocacy.

You can make life easier and feel confident about important decisions when you consult with qualified geriatric care managers.  They can help you with the complex issues associated with proper care coordination. If you would like to learn more about elder care and elder law, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Seniors Matter (July 7, 2022) “What is a geriatric care manager?”

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Identifying the Early Signs of Dementia

Identifying the Early Signs of Dementia

If you’re an older adult experiencing memory lapses, lack of focus or confusion — or you have a loved one with those symptoms, you may be concerned about the onset of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. However, other treatable conditions can cause similar symptoms, and they can be easy for doctors to miss, says Ardeshir Hashmi, M.D., a geriatrician and section chief of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Geriatric Medicine. There are clues that can help you in identifying the early signs of dementia.

“Sometimes there’s just a very superficial workup and then [the doctor says], ‘Here’s a pill for Alzheimer’s,’” Hashmi says. (While no drug has been proved to stop or slow the progression of dementia, there are several federally approved medications that can help manage the symptoms of Alzheimer’s.) “Before you make that conclusion, you should rule out all the other things that can be confused with dementia — things that are easily reversible.”

AARP’s recent article entitled “6 Medical Problems That Can Mimic Dementia — but Aren’t” identifies some common medical problems that can be mistaken for the early signs of dementia.

  1. Medication interactions or side effects. Older adults are more likely than younger people to develop cognitive impairment as a side effect of a medication. Drug toxicity is the reason in as many as 12% of patients who present with suspected dementia, research shows.
  2. A respiratory infection (including COVID-19). Any untreated infection can cause delirium — a sudden change in alertness, attention, memory and orientation that can mimic dementia. When you have an infection, the white blood cells in your body are sent to the infection site, causing a chemical change in the brain that makes some older adults feel drowsy, unfocused or confused. Respiratory infections are harder to diagnose in people over 65 because they are more likely to lack classic symptoms, such as a fever or a cough.
  3. A urinary tract infection (UTI). Research shows about 1 in 10 women older than 65 and up to 30% of women over 85 reported having had a urinary tract infection in the past year. Men are also more likely to experience UTIs as they age. However, most UTIs, and the accompanying cognitive issues, can be diagnosed with a simple urine test and then treated with an antibiotic.
  4. Sleep problems or disturbed sleep. If your sleep-wake cycle is disturbed or you have insomnia, you may experience dementia-like symptoms. These include trouble focusing, confusion, mental fatigue and irritability. Some older adults also suffer from sleep apnea, a sleep-related breathing problem that can deprive your brain of the oxygen it needs while you slumber, possibly causing long-term damage. Many seniors don’t realize they have this. Tell your doctor if you have signs of apnea, such as loud snoring, waking up gasping or choking, uncontrolled high blood pressure, a morning headache, or a dry mouth upon waking. If you are diagnosed with sleep apnea, using a continuous positive airway pressure machine (CPAP) while you snooze has been shown to be an effective treatment.
  5. Dehydration. If you take diuretics or laxatives, they can contribute to water loss. If you seem foggy or confused, see if your urine is dark yellow or brown, which can indicate a lack of fluids. Another sign of severe dehydration is a white coating on the tongue. To prevent dehydration, older adults should aim to get at least 48 ounces of caffeine-free fluids (six 8-ounce glasses) a day.
  6. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. This is a treatable disorder in which cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain, disrupting and damaging nearby brain tissue and causing cognitive problems. A neurologist can diagnose normal pressure hydrocephalus using brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid tests. It is treated by inserting a shunt into the brain to drain the fluid.

Know that dementia isn’t a normal expected part of aging. 11% of adults 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Identifying the early signs of dementia can dramatically increase the benefits of therapies and treatments. If you would like to learn more about dementia, and other related illnesses, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: AARP (March 21, 2022) “6 Medical Problems That Can Mimic Dementia — but Aren’t”

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Life Insurance can help Women with Estate Planning

Life Insurance can help Women with Estate Planning

The 2021 Insurance Barometer Survey revealed that 43% of women believe they would leave their families in a difficult financial situation, if they were to die prematurely. This is five percentage points higher than the men who were surveyed. While the need for planning for both women and their families are present, women aren’t satisfied they have done an adequate job when making certain that their goals are met and their families will be financially secure. Life insurance can help women with estate planning.

Insurance News Net’s recent article entitled “How Life Insurance Might Solve Women’s Estate-Planning Issues” says that women face unique planning challenges, like the fact they only earn about 82.3% compared to their male counterparts’ earnings, the U.S. Department of Labor reports. Lower earnings add to the difficulty of saving adequately for retirement. A recent Prudential survey found that only 54% of women have saved for retirement, with an average savings of $115,412, versus 61% of men, with an average savings of $202,859.

Women must also frequently care for generations of family members. In addition to caring for children, 75% of in-home care providers for older people are women, most often daughters, according to the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance. These seniors are often financially dependent on their female caregivers, so a woman may find herself supporting herself, a spouse or partner, her children and her aging parents. Planning for the continued care of these dependent family members is critical, if a woman is unable to continue in her role.

There is also the fact that women, on average, have longer lifespans than men. For women who are either married to or partnered with a man, this means a greater likelihood that the woman will be widowed later in her life. Women, on average, may need care for more extended periods than men during their later years. These expenses could substantially deplete the assets women plan to leave their families at death.

Life insurance can help protect families in a tax-advantaged way, while also providing income for retirement or benefits for long-term care. A life insurance death benefit can provide liquidity to care for multiple generations of dependent family members. If that policy builds cash value, as the need to care for family members eventually wanes, the owner can use the cash value for additional income in retirement. Some policies can provide funds for long-term care, if the need arises. Even a single policy can address all three planning concerns.

Speak with an estate planning attorney about the way that life insurance can help women with estate planning. If you would like to learn more about estate planning for women, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: Insurance News Net (March 9, 2022) “How Life Insurance Might Solve Women’s Estate-Planning Issues”

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Latest Ways to Prevent Dementia

Latest Ways to Prevent Dementia

Protecting brain health and cognitive functioning as we age is crucial. The CDC estimates that 5.8 million people in the U.S. are now living with dementia. With that figure only getting larger, many recent studies have been focused on understanding what causes the condition, as well as the latest ways to help prevent dementia. One recent study looked at the relationship between cognitive decline and something you may already have at home.

Best Life’s recent article entitled “Having One of These at Home Helps Prevent Dementia, New Study Says” reports that research shows different foods and drinks can either increase or mitigate your risk of dementia.

A recent study, for example, found that vitamin K has the potential to improve cognitive abilities in aging brains. A number of forms of this vitamin are found in leafy green vegetables, fermented foods, some cheeses, meats and fish. Research suggests that getting optimal daily doses may help protect your brain in the future.

Another new study found that having a pet at home could have positive effects on your cognitive health. The findings from a recent study suggest they could actually help slow rates of cognitive decline. Preliminary data were presented at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) meeting earlier this month, outlining how “sustained relationships with companion animals” could help keep your brain healthy.

“Prior studies have suggested that the human-animal bond may have health benefits, like decreasing blood pressure and stress,” said study author Tiffany Braley, MD, MS, associate professor of neurology at the University of Michigan Medical Center, said in a press release. “Our results suggest pet ownership may also be protective against cognitive decline.”

Richard Isaacson, MD, director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic in the Center for Brain Health at Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine, echoed this when speaking with CNN about the findings. According to Isaacson, who was not affiliated with the study, owning a pet or multiple pets integrates “core components of a brain-healthy lifestyle.”

“Cognitive engagement, socialization, physical activity and having a sense of purpose can separately, or even more so in combination, address key modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease dementia,” he told CNN.

The study looked at the cognitive data from 1,369 adults over the age of 50 from a University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study. The participants had an average age of 65 years and normal cognitive skills when the study started. Over 50% of the participants owned pets, and of those, 32% were long-time pet owners (owing pets for over five years).

Researchers found that pet owners’ cognitive composite scores decreased at a slower rate, when compared with non-pet owners. The results were stronger for long-term pet owners, whose average scores were 1.2 points higher than non-pet owners at the six-year mark. Demographics seemed to have an impact. Pet owners generally had higher socioeconomic status, when compared with non-pet owners. Researchers also found that college-educated adults, Black adults and men who were long-term pet owners had even more prominent cognitive benefits.

While researchers couldn’t definitively say why long-term pet ownership had the best effect, according to Braley, having a pet may help mitigate stress and keep you moving—both of which aid in keeping your brain healthy.

“As stress can negatively affect cognitive function, the potential stress-buffering effects of pet ownership could provide a plausible reason for our findings,” Braley stated in the AAN press release. “A companion animal can also increase physical activity, which could benefit cognitive health.”

He noted that additional research is needed to confirm the most recent findings. These are just a few of the latest ways to help prevent dementia. If you are interested in learning more about dementia, and other cognitive conditions, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: Best Life (April 26, 2022) “Having One of These at Home Helps Prevent Dementia, New Study Says”

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Avoid Family Disagreements over Caregiving

Avoid Family Disagreements over Caregiving

Taking care of a loved one can be all consuming and taxing to family relationships. According to the “Caregiving in the U.S. 2020” report by AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving, “about one in five caregivers report experiencing high financial strain as a result of providing care.” This is especially true for those involved in high-intensity caregiving for over 21 hours a week, who often deplete their savings and go into debt. However, there are steps you can take to avoid family disagreements over caregiving.

AARP’s recent article entitled “How Caregivers Can Stop Arguing About Money” says caregiving-related money conflicts are only partially about dollars and cents. Some are predicated on differences in priorities:

  • Should the family’s finite resources be directed to the care recipient or spread among all family members?
  • Should the cost of something like a front door ramp for a parent’s house be borne equally by all the adult siblings or solely by the primary caregiver who lives with that parent?
  • Should a declining parent give all her assets to the adult child committed to caregiving or divide them among her children?

Caregivers, care recipients and other family members may have different answers to such questions and then can get into heated discussions. This can mean hard feelings that can destroy family relationships during the caregiving years and beyond. Here are a few ideas on how to avoid such conflicts:

One strategy to help caregiving families avoid constant financial conflict is to handle little and big questions differently. For the little decisions that need to be made every day, such as which pharmacy to use, family members should defer to the primary caregiver’s judgment. However, for more consequential decisions like selling the family home to help pay for a parent’s nursing home care, all family members should feel their opinions are sought out and respected.  It is typically the family members who feel like their voices aren’t heard, who protest the most loudly and cause the fiercest debates.

If caregiving family members still can’t find a way to stop arguing about money, then they should consider meeting with a member of the clergy, a family therapist, or elder mediator. A pro is trained to manage emotions, clarify points and frame acceptable compromises. They can help avoid further disagreements over caregiving that can cause damage to already damaged family relationships. If you would like to learn more about caregiving, or long-term care facilities, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: AARP (Feb. 8, 2022) “How Caregivers Can Stop Arguing About Money”

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Information in our blogs is very general in nature and should not be acted upon without first consulting with an attorney. Please feel free to contact Texas Trust Law to schedule a complimentary consultation.
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