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Divorce Impacts your Estate Plan

Divorce Impacts your Estate Plan

Divorce is a life-altering event that significantly impacts various aspects of life, including your estate plan. Clients either going through a divorce or have recently finalized one often feel uncertain about how the divorce will affect their estate. This article shares crucial aspects of revising your estate plan after a divorce, ensuring that your assets and loved ones are protected according to your current wishes.

When you get divorced, updating your estate plan is imperative, as your ex-spouse may still be entitled to certain benefits. Your estate, which includes all assets owned, might still be accessible to your ex-spouse unless changes are made. Revising your estate plan ensures that your assets are distributed according to your updated preferences. Updating your will is essential after a divorce. Your ex-spouse may still be named as the executor or beneficiary. By revising your will, you can ensure that your estate is administered by someone you trust and that your assets are distributed according to your latest intentions.

Revoking your power of attorney is a critical step post-divorce. Your ex-spouse may be able to make financial and care decisions on your behalf. It’s advisable to appoint someone you trust to handle these matters, ensuring that your affairs are managed according to your current preferences.

Beneficiary designations are often overlooked during estate planning after divorce. It’s crucial to revise these as your ex-spouse might still be listed as a beneficiary on life insurance policies, retirement accounts and other financial instruments. Updating these designations is a simple yet essential step in ensuring that your estate is distributed according to your current wishes. Your ex-spouse is likely named as a trustee or beneficiary if you have a living trust. Post-divorce, you need to revise this document to reflect your current wishes. This might include appointing a new trustee or changing the beneficiaries.

If you have minor children, your estate plan probably includes guardianship designations. Post-divorce, reassess these choices. You might want to name someone other than your ex-spouse as the guardian, ensuring that your children’s care aligns with your current wishes.

State law and the terms of your divorce decree can impact your estate plan. Understanding these implications and ensuring that your estate plan complies with legal requirements is important. An experienced estate planning attorney can provide valuable insights and guidance.

Don’t wait until the divorce is finalized. Start updating your estate plan as soon as the divorce is pending. This proactive approach ensures that your interests are protected throughout the divorce process.

Divorce significantly affects your estate plan, and it’s crucial to take timely action to revise it. Remember, updating your estate plan post-divorce is not just a legal necessity; ensuring that your assets and loved ones are protected according to your current wishes is crucial. Don’t hesitate to seek professional assistance to navigate this complex process. If you would like to read more about estate planning post divorce, please visit our previous posts. 

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The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 3

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 2 is out now!

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 2 is out now!

Millennials continue to be a mystery to everyone – except Millennials!

In this third part of Millennial Mysteries, Brad and his Millennial son, Sam, discuss and review a movie they recently saw together: Godzilla Minus One. Boomer Brad thinks this is one of the BEST movies he has ever seen – and they explain why here.

They have a very entertaining discussion on how movies affect Millennials and what Millennials want to see in movies. And this version of Godzilla was nominated for an Oscar!

 

In each episode of The Estate of The Union podcast, host and lawyer Brad Wiewel will give valuable insights into the confusing world of estate planning, making an often daunting subject easier to understand. It is Estate Planning Made Simple! The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 2 is out now! The episode can be found on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you get your podcasts. If you would prefer to watch the video version, please visit our YouTube page. Please click on the links to listen to or watch the new installment of The Estate of The Union podcast. We hope you enjoy it.

The Estate of The Union Season |Episode 2

 

Texas Trust Law focuses its practice exclusively in the area of wills, probate, estate planning, asset protection, and special needs planning. Brad Wiewel is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We provide estate planning services, asset protection planning, business planning, and retirement exit strategies.

www.texastrustlaw.com/read-our-books

Understanding how a Guardianship and Conservatorship Contrast

Understanding how a Guardianship and Conservatorship Contrast

Guardianship and conservatorship are two legal mechanisms designed to assist individuals who cannot manage their own affairs. While they share similarities, understanding how a guardianship and conservatorship contrast is vital. Guardianship typically pertains to personal and health care decisions, while conservatorship deals with financial matters. Both require court appointment and carry significant responsibility.

Guardianship involves the legal authority granted to a guardian to make decisions on behalf of a person who is unable to do so. This typically pertains to personal, health and welfare decisions. A court appoints a guardian when an individual is deemed incapacitated, and the guardian may have to make a wide range of personal decisions for them. A guardian has significant responsibilities, including making personal care decisions, overseeing living arrangements and ensuring the overall well-being of their ward. They must keep detailed records and report to the court regularly, demonstrating that they are acting in the best interests of the ward.

In cases involving minor children, guardianship becomes essential when parents are unable to provide care. The guardian, appointed by the court, assumes responsibility for the child’s personal needs and welfare, acting in their best interests. This is often seen when parents are unable or unwilling to care for their child or in the event of the death of the parents.

Conservatorship, on the other hand, is primarily focused on financial matters. A conservator is appointed to manage the financial affairs of an individual who is unable to do so themselves, due to incapacity or other reasons. This includes managing a person’s assets, making investments and handling financial decisions. In conservatorship proceedings, the court appoints a conservator to oversee the financial needs of the incapacitated individual. The conservator must act responsibly and is often required to provide the court with periodic financial reports.

While a guardian manages personal and medical decisions, a conservator handles the financial aspects, such as personal and financial records, asset management and financial planning. This distinction is crucial in understanding the roles and responsibilities each holds.

The legal authority granted to a guardian differs from that of a conservator. A guardian makes personal and medical decisions, while a conservator focuses on financial and asset management. This division ensures that all aspects of an individual’s life are cared for adequately. Both guardians and conservators are appointed by the court and must act in the best interests of their wards. They are supervised by the court and must provide regular reports to demonstrate their compliance with legal responsibilities.

Incorporating guardianship and conservatorship into an estate plan is crucial. An estate plan can appoint a guardian or conservator in advance, providing clarity and direction in the event of incapacitation. Including a power of attorney in your estate plan can preempt the need for a court-appointed guardian or conservator. This allows you to choose who will make decisions on your behalf, if you become unable to do so.

An effective estate plan, including wills and power of attorney, can provide peace of mind and ensure that your wishes are honored. It prepares for scenarios where you might be incapacitated, ensuring that your personal and financial matters are in trusted hands. Navigating the complexities of guardianship and conservatorship can be challenging. A lawyer can help you understand how a guardianship and conservatorship contrast. The assistance of an estate planning or elder lawyer is invaluable in understanding your options, the legal process and ensuring that your loved one’s needs are met.

Each situation is unique, and a lawyer can provide tailored advice depending on your specific circumstances. They can help you navigate the legal system, ensuring the best outcome for you and your loved ones. If you would like to learn more about guardianship, please visit our previous posts. 

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Pitfalls of Adding a Child to Your Home's Deed

Pitfalls of Adding a Child to Your Home’s Deed

As an estate planning attorney, I’ve witnessed many parents consider adding a child to the deed of their home with good intentions. They often view this as a simple strategy to ensure that their property seamlessly passes to their children without the complexities of probate. However, this well-intentioned move can lead to numerous unexpected complications and financial burdens. This article explains the pitfalls of adding a child to your home’s deed might not be the optimal choice for your estate plan.

To begin, let’s clarify what it means to add a child to the deed of your home. By doing this, you are legally transferring partial ownership rights to your child. This action is commonly perceived as a method to circumvent probate. However, it is imperative to understand that it also entails relinquishing a degree of control over your asset.

When you add your child to the deed, you are not just avoiding probate; you are creating a co-ownership situation. This means your child gains legal rights over the property, equal to yours. Such a shift in ownership can have significant legal ramifications, particularly if you need to make decisions about the property in the future.

Avoiding probate is often cited as the primary reason for adding a child to a home’s deed. Probate can be a lengthy and sometimes costly process. However, it’s essential to weigh these concerns against the potential risks and challenges of joint ownership. Probate avoidance, while seemingly beneficial, does not always equate to the most advantageous approach. The process of probate also serves to clear debts and distribute assets in a legally structured manner. By bypassing this process, you might be opening the door to more complicated legal and financial issues in the future.

One of the most overlooked aspects of adding a child to your deed is the gift tax implications. The IRS views this act as a gift. It’s important to understand that the IRS has established specific rules regarding gifts. If the value of your property interest exceeds the gift tax exclusion limit, you might be required to file a gift tax return. This could potentially lead to a significant tax liability, an aspect often not considered in the initial decision-making process.

The loss of control over your property is a critical consideration. Once your child becomes a co-owner, they have equal say in decisions regarding the property. This change can affect your ability to sell or refinance the property and can become particularly problematic if your child encounters financial issues. In a co-ownership scenario, if your child faces legal or financial troubles, your property could be at risk. Creditors might target your home for your child’s debts, and in the case of a child’s divorce, the property might become part of a marital settlement. Adding a child to your deed can inadvertently lead to family disputes and legal challenges, especially if you have more than one child. Equal distribution of assets is often a key consideration in estate planning to maintain family harmony.

A significant financial consideration is the potential capital gains tax burden for your child. When a property is inherited, it usually benefits from a step-up in basis, which can significantly reduce capital gains tax when the property is eventually sold. However, this is not the case when a child is added to a deed. Without the step-up in basis, if your child sells the property, they may face a substantial capital gains tax based on the difference between the selling price and the original purchase price. This tax burden can be considerably higher than if they had inherited the property.

There are several alternatives to adding a child to your home’s deed. Creating a living trust, for instance, allows you to maintain control over your property while also ensuring a smooth transition of assets to your beneficiaries. A living trust provides the flexibility of controlling your assets while you’re alive and ensures they are distributed according to your wishes upon your death. This approach can also offer the benefit of avoiding probate without the downsides of directly adding a child to your deed.

Given the complexities and potential pitfalls of adding a child to your home’s deed, seeking professional legal advice is essential. An experienced estate planning attorney can help navigate these complexities and tailor a plan that aligns with your specific needs and goals.

While adding a child to your home’s deed might seem straightforward to manage your estate, it’s fraught with potential problems and complications. It’s vital to consider all the implications and seek professional guidance to ensure your estate plan is effective, efficient and aligned with your long-term intentions. If you would like to learn more about managing real property in your estate plan, please visit our previous posts. 

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Endowed Scholarships create an Important Legacy

Endowed Scholarships create an Important Legacy

Endowed scholarships are powerful tools in the realm of charitable giving, often used as a part of comprehensive estate planning. An endowed scholarship is a significant philanthropic commitment that involves establishing a fund to provide scholarships to students, typically in perpetuity. It’s a donation and a long-term investment in future generations, aligning with the donor’s values and interests. Endowed scholarships can be established during a donor’s lifetime or through estate gifts, allowing individuals to create an important legacy reflecting their passion for education and student support. For a detailed overview of how endowed scholarships function within charitable giving and estate planning, see The National Association of Charitable Gift Planners.

To endow a scholarship means providing a stable funding source by creating an endowment fund. An endowment fund is typically a large sum of money that is invested. The earned income from the investments is used to fund the scholarship. The principal amount of the endowment remains intact, allowing the scholarship to be awarded yearly indefinitely, based on the income generated.

In estate planning, establishing an endowed scholarship can offer a meaningful way to memorialize a loved one or to honor family and friends, while also providing tax benefits. It serves as a lasting testament to the donor’s commitment to education and charitable giving, ensuring that their philanthropic goals continue to be met even after they are gone.

Establishing an endowed fund involves careful planning and collaboration with financial or philanthropic advisors. The donor needs to decide on the amount to endow, which should align with their financial capabilities and the objectives of the scholarship. The process also involves legal considerations, since the terms of the scholarship and the fund’s administration must be clearly defined and documented. A comprehensive guide on endowment funds can be found at The Council on Foundations.

Legal and financial planning is crucial in creating a scholarship fund. This involves drafting the terms of the scholarship, deciding on the fund’s management and ensuring that the scholarship aligns with the overall estate plan. The donor must also work with the chosen educational institution or charitable organization to set up the fund and define how the scholarship will be administered.

There are numerous benefits to establishing an endowed scholarship for both the donor and the recipients. From a donor’s perspective, endowed scholarships provide a way to make a significant, lasting impact while also reaping financial rewards. They can lead to potential income tax deductions and be a part of a strategic plan for estate gifts, reducing the taxable estate.

For scholarship recipients, an endowed scholarship represents a reliable source of tuition assistance, often making the difference in their ability to pursue higher education. These scholarships can be designated according to the donor’s wishes, targeting specific fields of study, financial need, or other criteria, thus allowing donors to support areas they are passionate about. One of the most important aspects of establishing an endowed scholarship is setting the criteria for scholarship recipients. This process allows donors to personalize their scholarship according to their values and the impact they wish to make. Criteria can include academic merit, financial need, specific areas of study, or any other factors the donor deems important.

Balancing the donor’s wishes with institutional policies is key. While the donor can designate the scholarship according to their preferences, they must also ensure that the criteria are feasible and aligned with the institution’s policies and regulations. Naming a scholarship can be a very meaningful way to honor family, friends, or personal causes. It ensures that the donor’s or the loved one’s name is associated with educational support and philanthropy for years to come.

Effective management of the endowment is crucial to ensure its longevity and impact. This involves prudent investment strategies to grow the principal amount, while generating sufficient income to support the scholarship. Regular reviews and adjustments to the investment strategy are necessary to align with market conditions and the scholarship’s objectives.

Donors and institutions may also seek additional contributions to the scholarship fund. These contributions may be made by the donor, family members, or others who share the donor’s vision, thus helping to grow the fund and increase its impact over time.

Incorporating endowed scholarships into an estate plan can have significant tax implications. Donors can benefit from income tax deductions for their contributions to the scholarship fund. By reducing the taxable estate, endowed scholarships can also be an effective tool in estate planning, potentially lowering estate taxes.

Endowed scholarships are more than just financial aid; they offer a unique opportunity to create an important legacy of support, ensuring that the donor’s passion for education and charitable giving continues to make a difference for many years. If you would like to read more about endowed scholarships, and other forms of charitable giving, please visit our previous posts. 

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Integrating Retirement Accounts into your Estate Plan

Integrating Retirement Accounts into your Estate Plan

Retirement accounts, such as IRAs and 401(k)s, play a pivotal role in many estate plans. They are not just savings vehicles for retirement; they are also crucial assets that can be passed on to beneficiaries. An effective estate plan should integrate retirement accounts seamlessly, supporting your overall retirement and estate objectives.

When incorporating retirement accounts into an estate plan, it’s essential to understand the tax implications and the rules governing beneficiary designations. These factors can significantly impact how your retirement assets are distributed and taxed upon your death. Retirement accounts are subject to income tax and, in some cases, estate tax.

Retirement accounts, such as IRAs and 401(k)s, typically bypass the probate process, as they are transferred directly to the named beneficiaries. This direct transfer can simplify the estate settlement process and provide quicker access to funds for your beneficiaries. It’s important to understand that while retirement accounts may avoid probate, they are still part of your overall estate for tax purposes. Proper planning can help ensure that your retirement assets are distributed efficiently and tax-advantaged.

Roth IRAs are unique retirement accounts that offer tax-free growth and withdrawals. They can be a valuable tool in estate planning, particularly for those looking to leave tax-free assets to their beneficiaries. Unlike traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs do not require minimum distributions during the account owner’s lifetime, allowing the assets to grow tax-free for a longer period.

When including Roth IRAs in your estate plan, consider the potential tax benefits for your beneficiaries. Since distributions from Roth IRAs are generally tax-free, they can provide a significant financial advantage to your heirs. Tax-deferred retirement accounts, like traditional IRAs and 401(k)s, allow contributions to grow tax-free until withdrawal. This feature can lead to significant tax savings over time. However, it’s essential to consider the tax implications for your beneficiaries.

Beneficiary designations are a critical aspect of retirement planning. These designations determine who will inherit your retirement accounts upon your death. It’s crucial to regularly review and update your beneficiary designations to ensure that they align with your current estate plan and wishes. Failure to update beneficiary designations can lead to unintended consequences, such as an ex-spouse or a deceased individual being named as the beneficiary. Beneficiaries are generally subject to income tax on the distributions upon inheriting a tax-deferred retirement account. Planning for these tax implications is crucial in ensuring that your beneficiaries are not burdened with unexpected taxes.

Retirement assets are considered part of your estate and can impact your overall estate value and tax liability. Properly integrating retirement accounts into your estate plan can help achieve a balanced and tax-efficient distribution of your entire estate. This includes considering the impact on federal and state estate taxes and the income tax implications for your beneficiaries.

In conclusion, integrating retirement accounts into your estate plan is a complex but essential task. Understanding the nuances of how these accounts work in the context of estate and tax planning can ensure that your financial legacy is preserved and passed on according to your wishes. Consultation with financial and legal professionals is key to navigating this intricate aspect of estate planning effectively. If you would like to learn more about retirement accounts, please visit our previous posts. 

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When and How to get Letters of Testamentary

When and How to get Letters of Testamentary

The executor manages assets until the probate process is complete. They also need proof of their authority to do so. The court-issued Letter of Testamentary provides evidence of their authority and explains a recent article from Forbes, What Is A Letter Of Testamentary?” The article details how this document works and when and how to get Letters of Testamentary.

A decedent’s last will and testament names their executor, who will manage their estate. Their duties include filing probate paperwork with the court, notifying potential heirs and creditors of the probate process and managing assets, including paying bills from the estate’s bank account. The executor is also the one to set up the estate’s bank account. When the estate is nearly completed, assets are distributed to beneficiaries.

Third parties need to know who the executor is. The executor also needs proof of their authority to carry out their job tasks. The letter is a simple document issued by the probate court and typically includes the following information:

  • The court issuing the letter.
  • The name and contact details of the executor (also referred to as a “personal representative” of the estate).
  • That the personal representative was named in the will of the decedent
  • The date the executor was granted authority to manage the decedent’s estate.

What is the difference between a Letter of Testamentary and a Letter of Administration? A letter of administration can be used during the probate process. However, it serves a different process. The court uses the letter of administration if a person dies without having named a personal representative or executor. The court appoints a person to manage the estate and probate process, and the court then creates a Letter of Administration giving this individual the authority to act.

There is no guarantee or requirement for the court to appoint a family member to serve in this role. This is another reason why having a will that names an executor is essential if the family wishes to be involved in settling the estate.

What if there is no will? Without a will, there is no executor. Someone is still needed to manage the decedent’s assets and take care of the steps in probate. A surviving family member or loved one may open a probate case after death, even when there is no will. This involves filing court documents and attending a hearing. The court will then appoint an administrator, determining who has the desire and ability to serve in the role.

What about assets held in trust? If assets have been placed in a trust, a trustee has been named and is in charge of following the trust’s directions. There is no probate court involvement, which is why so many opt to place their assets in a trust as part of their estate plan. The trust becomes the legal owner of the assets once they are placed in the trust. The trust creator often acts as the trustee during their lifetime and names a successor trustee who takes over in case of incapacity or death. That person has the authority to manage the trust assets and transfer them through the trust administration process without any involvement from the court.

However, if assets were not placed in the trust, they must go through the probate process, and an executor or personal representative will need a letter to manage them.

If you have lost a loved one, or are choosing an executor, ensure you have a complete understanding of when and how to get letters of testamentary. Work with an experienced estate planning attorney familiar with your state’s laws and the court process of probate. If you are interested in learning more about probate, please visit our previous posts.

Reference: Forbes (Jan. 17, 2024) “What Is A Letter Of Testamentary?”

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Texas Trust Law Attorney Zachary Wiewel discusses the Corporate Transparency Act

Texas Trust Law Attorney Zachary Wiewel discusses the Corporate Transparency Act

Texas Trust Law Attorney Zachary Wiewel discusses the Corporate Transparency Act

We are always thrilled when one of our attorneys is featured in industry leading publications. Recently Zachary Wiewel was featured in a NAV.com article discussing the increasing importance of the Corporate Transparency Act.

The Corporate Transparency Act (CTA) became effective on January 1, 2021, but has just now entered its implementation phase. It is a federal law that imposes stringent reporting requirements on business entities. Zach discusses who must make the required reporting and what they must report. He also breaks down the potential penalties for non-compliance. This act and its requirements may have a significant impact on those individuals and families that maintain LLCs and other corporate vehicles in their estate planning.

We hope you take a moment to read this informative article.

Texas Trust Law Attorney Zachary Wiewel discusses the Corporate Transparency Act can be found at the link below:

https://www.nav.com/business-formation/navigating-corporate-transparency-act-insights-small-businesses/

If you would like to learn more about Zachary Wiewel, JD, LL.M. (Tax) please visit his bio.


WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO

Meetings with attorneys always seem to deal with the WHAT and HOW of estate planning and probate. At Texas Trust Law we call ourselves The Peace of Mind People®. We want to take a moment and tell you WHY we do what we do.

Here is the WHY of Texas Trust Law: We LOVE taking complex legal concepts and making those understandable to our clients and their advisors so they can take action. That then allows us to bring peace of mind to our clients and their family if they become incapacitated, at death, and when they are concerned about protecting themselves, their wealth, and their loved ones from predators, problematic family members and the IRS.

Life Insurance is vital to Estate Planning

Life Insurance is vital to Estate Planning

Life insurance is vital to comprehensive estate planning. Integrating life insurance policies into estate planning can provide financial security for your heirs and ensure that your estate is distributed according to your wishes. When used effectively, life insurance can solve a range of estate planning challenges, from providing immediate cash flow to beneficiaries to helping cover estate tax liabilities.

Incorporating life insurance into your estate plan requires careful consideration of the type of policy that best suits your needs, whether term life insurance for temporary coverage or whole life insurance for permanent protection. It’s essential to understand the insurance company’s role in managing these policies and ensuring that they align with your overall estate objectives.

Life insurance can play a crucial role in estate planning. It can provide a death benefit to cover immediate expenses after your passing, such as funeral costs and debts, thereby alleviating financial burdens on your heirs. Furthermore, life insurance proceeds can be used to pay estate taxes, ensuring that your beneficiaries receive their inheritance without liquidating other estate assets.

When selecting life insurance for estate planning purposes, it’s important to consider the different types of policies available, such as term insurance for short-term needs and permanent insurance for long-term planning. An insurance agent can be a valuable resource in this process, helping to determine the right policy type for your estate planning goals.

Term life insurance offers coverage for a specified period and is often used for short-term estate planning needs, such as providing financial support to minor children. On the other hand, permanent life insurance policies, like whole life or universal life insurance, offer lifelong coverage and can build cash value over time, which can be an asset in your overall estate.

Life insurance trusts, particularly irrevocable life insurance trusts (ILITs), play a significant role in estate planning. By placing a life insurance policy within a trust, you can exert greater control over how the death benefit is distributed among your beneficiaries. The trust owns the policy, removing it from your taxable estate and potentially reducing estate tax liabilities.

Since the trust is irrevocable, it provides a layer of protection against creditors and legal judgments, ensuring that the life insurance payout is used solely for the benefit of your designated beneficiaries.

When considering life insurance in estate planning, it’s important to evaluate how the death benefit of a life insurance policy will impact your estate’s overall financial picture and the inheritance your heirs will receive. The proceeds from a life insurance policy are typically not subject to federal income tax. However, they can still be included in your gross estate for estate tax purposes, depending on the ownership of the policy.

One of the primary uses of life insurance in estate planning is to provide funds to pay estate taxes. This is especially relevant for larger estates that may face significant federal and state estate taxes. The death benefit from a life insurance policy can be used to cover these taxes, ensuring that your heirs do not have to liquidate other estate assets to meet tax obligations. In planning for estate taxes, working with professionals, such as estate attorneys and tax advisors, is essential to ensure that your life insurance coverage aligns with your anticipated tax liabilities.

Life insurance can offer substantial financial support to your heirs and beneficiaries upon your passing. Whether providing for a spouse, children, or other dependents, life insurance can ensure that your loved ones are cared for financially. This is particularly important in cases where other estate assets are not readily liquid or if you wish to leave a specific inheritance to certain beneficiaries.

When selecting life insurance for this purpose, consider the needs of your heirs, their ability to manage a large sum of money and how the death benefit will complement other aspects of your estate plan.

In conclusion, life insurance plays a vital role in comprehensive estate planning. By carefully selecting the right type of policy, designating appropriate beneficiaries and considering the use of trusts, you can ensure that your estate plan effectively addresses your financial goals and provides for your loved ones after your passing. If you would like to learn more about life insurance and estate planning, please visit our previous posts. 

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The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 3

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 1 is out now!

The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 1 is out now!

We are excited to begin our third season of The Estate of The Union! Criminal law always fascinates us. But what we think happens based on TV and movies is far different from reality. It is when the trial is over and the guilty verdict returned that the appeals process starts. That’s the most mysterious part.

We are fortunate to have Sharon Keller, the Presiding Judge of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals as a guest. The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals is the highest court in Texas for criminal cases (the Texas Supreme Court only rules on civil lawsuits – who knew – now you do!).

Judge Keller shares the inside story on what happens on appeals and talks about the unique processes in play when someone has received the death penalty. Plus Judge Keller has an easy-going manner that makes it all make sense. It truly is a fascinating conversation.

 

 

In each episode of The Estate of The Union podcast, host and lawyer Brad Wiewel will give valuable insights into the confusing world of estate planning, making an often daunting subject easier to understand. It is Estate Planning Made Simple! The Estate of The Union Season 3|Episode 1 is out now! The episode can be found on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you get your podcasts. If you would prefer to watch the video version, please visit our YouTube page. Please click on the links to listen to or watch the new installment of The Estate of The Union podcast. We hope you enjoy it.

The Estate of The Union Season 2|Episode 4 – How To Give Yourself a Charitable Gift is out now!

 

Texas Trust Law focuses its practice exclusively in the area of wills, probate, estate planning, asset protection, and special needs planning. Brad Wiewel is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We provide estate planning services, asset protection planning, business planning, and retirement exit strategies.

www.texastrustlaw.com/read-our-books

Information in our blogs is very general in nature and should not be acted upon without first consulting with an attorney. Please feel free to contact Texas Trust Law to schedule a complimentary consultation.
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