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you must plan for your spouse's Medicaid

You Must Plan for Your Spouse’s Medicaid

"When a spouse enters a nursing home, the cost of care can be financially devastating. Many families are simply unable to afford long-term care without applying for Medicaid."

Medicaid eligibility is based on income. This means that there are restrictions on the resources—both income and assets—that you can have when you apply. So you must plan for your spouse’s Medicaid.

The Times Herald’s recent article entitled “Elder law planning for Medicaid” says that one of the toughest requirements for Medicaid to grasp is the financial eligibility. These rules for the cost of long-term care are tricky, especially when the Medicaid applicant is married.

To be eligible for Medicaid for long-term care, an applicant generally cannot have more than $2,400 in countable assets in their name, if their gross monthly income is $2,382 (which is the 2021 income limit) or more. An applicant may have no more than $8,000 in countable assets, if their gross monthly income is less than $2,382 (2021 income limit).

However, federal law says that certain protections are designed to prevent a spouse from becoming impoverished when their spouse goes into a nursing home and applies for Medicaid. In 2021, the spouse of a Medicaid recipient living in a nursing home—known as “the community spouse”—can keep up to $126,420 (which is the maximum Community Spouse Resource Allowance “CSRA”) and a minimum of $26,076 (the minimum CSRA) without placing the Medicaid eligibility of the spouse who is receiving long-term care in jeopardy.

The calculation to determine the amount of the CSRA, the countable assets of both the community spouse and the spouse in the nursing home are totaled on the date of the nursing home admission. That is known as the “snapshot” date. The community spouse is entitled to retain 50% of the couple’s total countable assets up to a max. The rest must be “spent-down” to qualify for the program.

In addition to the CSRA, there are also federal rules concerning income for the spouse. In many states, the community spouse can keep all of his or her own income no matter how much it is. If the community spouse’s income is less than the amount set by the state as the minimum needed to live on (“the Minimum Monthly Maintenance Needs Allowance” or “MMMNA”), then some of the applicant spouse’s income can also be allocated to the community spouse to make up the difference (called “the Spousal Allowance”). Planning for your spouse’s Medicaid is pretty complex, so speak with an experienced elder law attorney.

If you are interested in learning more about Medicaid and nursing home planning, please visit our previous posts. 

Reference: The Times Herald (Jan. 8, 2021) “Elder law planning for Medicaid”